Pakistan’s new PM backs sex harassment probe against Imran Khan

Imran-Khan-Ayesha-Gulalai-

Pakistan’s new prime minister Friday backed a parliamentary investigation into allegations of sexual harassment leveled by a female lawmaker against firebrand opposition leader Imran Khan, in a scandal that has gripped the conservative country.

The scandal erupted after Ayesha Gulalai, a National Assembly member from conservative Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, accused Khan and other leaders of his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party of sending obscene text messages and promoting a culture of sexism.

The accusations come days after Pakistan’s top court disqualified Khan’s long-time political nemesis Nawaz Sharif from the premiership on corruption charges, spurring public celebrations from the cricketer-turned-politician and his supporters.

Newly-elected Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi, seen as a Sharif loyalist, on Friday backed moves to form a parliamentary committee to investigate the matter after a group of legislators raised the allegations in the house.

“This is an issue concerning the house’s integrity — I will suggest forming a closed-door, special committee to probe the allegations and present its findings in the house,” Abbasi told parliament.

In a televised press conference earlier this week Gulalai accused Khan of harassing female leaders in the PTI and resigned from the party.

“Imran Khan’s list of sins is very long but the way he sends obscene text messages — and the way women and girls are being treated in this party, I will say that the honour of women is not safe, because of Imran Khan and because of the people around him,” Gulalai told reporters in Islamabad.

“I cannot compromise my integrity and that’s why I decided to take this step,” she added.

Gulalai has not released any of the alleged text messages, prompting many in Pakistan to believe the case may be politically motivated.

Khan, along with the PTI’s top brass, batted down the allegations, accusing Sharif’s ruling Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) of using money to defame political rivals.

“I was astonished to hear that. I suspect that the (PML-N) has used her against me,” Khan told broadcaster ARY.

“Do your worst; stoop as low as you can; me & my struggle-hardened party will become ever stronger IA,” Khan wrote on Twitter.

The accusations evoked a social media storm and provoked a debate on sexual harassment in Pakistan, with Khan’s opponents accusing him of promoting Western values while others called for acid attacks targeting Gulalai, according to news reports.

The backlash targeting Gulalai in particular provoked criticism from women’s rights activists, who said the claims should be investigated rather than met with threats of violence, particularly in a country where women have struggled for their rights for decades. – AFP

 

 

 

 

 

living with autism family issues siblings

Raising a child with autism places some extraordinary demands on parents as individuals and on the family as a whole. Prime among these demands is the lack of enough hours in the day to do all one wishes. Specifically, the time involved in meeting the needs of a family member with autism may leave parents with little time for their other children.

Many parents feel that even as they do all they can for their child with autism, they are always struggling with how best to respond to the needs of the family as a whole. They say that although their own life as an individual may be put “on hold” and a couple may share an understanding of the need to make sacrifices on behalf of their child with autism, few parents are willing to make that same demand of other children in the family. As a result, there is a continual tension between the needs of the child with autism and those of the other children.

This section offers suggestions to parents about ways to help the other children in the family cope gracefully and effectively with the experience of having a brother or sister with autism. Research indicates that the majority of brothers and sisters of children with autism cope well with their experiences. That does not mean, however, that they do not encounter special challenges in learning how to deal with a sibling who has autism or a related disorder.

There are special demands on these siblings, and learning to manage these demands will make their childhood easier and will teach them skills that will make them more effective and resilient adults. The most important teachers of these coping skills are a child’s mother and father. The gifts you give to your youngsters in childhood will serve them immediately and in all the years ahead.

Sources of Stress for Siblings

 

Not all siblings will experience these stressful issues, but here are some to be aware of:

  • Embarrassment around peers; jealousy regarding amount of time parents spend with their brother/sister
  • Frustration over not being able to engage or get a response from their brother/sister
  • Being the target of aggressive behaviors
  • Trying to make up for the deficits of their brother/sister
  • Concern regarding their parents’ stress and grief
  • Concern over their role in future caregiving

Many of the suggestions provided below are things parents can do within the family to help a child understand what autism is all about, to improve interactions among the children in the family, and to ensure brothers and sisters grow up feeling they have benefited from the love and attention we all need.

Explaining Autism to Children

 

Common sense tells us and research supports the idea that children need to understand what autism is all about. The rule of thumb: Do it early and do it often! It is important that your children know about autism and that the information you give them is appropriate for their developmental age. From early childhood, they need explanations that help them understand the behaviors that are of concern to them. For the preschool-age child this may be as simple as “Rick doesn’t know how to talk,” while for the adolescent, it may involve a conversation about the possible genetics of autism.

The key is to remember to adjust your information to your child’s age and understanding. For example, very young children are mostly concerned about unusual behaviors that may frighten or puzzle them. An older child will have concerns of a more interpersonal nature, such as how to explain autism to his/her friends. For the adolescent, these concerns may shift to the long-range needs of their sibling with autism and the role they will play in future care. Every age has its needs, and your task is to listen carefully to your child’s immediate concerns.

Another key to success is to remember that children need to be told about autism again and again as they grow up. Young children may use the words they hear us use, but not understand the full meaning of those words until they are much older. Don’t be misled by a young child’s vocabulary of words like “autism” or “discrete trial.” That does not mean the terms have real meaning for him/her. Just as you would not expect an early conversation about the obvious physical differences between boys and girls to constitute a sufficient sex education for children 5 or 10 years later, similarly, you must explain again and again, in increasingly mature terms, what autism is all about.

The Autism Society offers practical, age-appropriate information on teaching children and teens to make friends with their classmates on the autism spectrum.

Helping Your Children Form a Relationship

 

Because of the nature of autism, it is usually difficult for a young child to form a satisfying relationship with a brother or sister who has the disorder. For example, your child’s attempts to play with his/her brother are probably rebuffed by his ignoring her, fall flat because of his lack of play skills, or end abruptly because his tantrums are frightening. How many of us would keep trying to form a friendship with someone who turned her back when we spoke to her or, even worse, seemed angry when we approached? It is not surprising that young children may become discouraged by the reactions they encounter and seek playmates elsewhere.

The good news is that young children can be taught simple skills that will enable them to engage their brother or sister in playful interactions. Research has shown that siblings can learn basic teaching strategies to engage their brother or sister with autism. These skills include things like making sure they have their brother’s attention, giving simple instructions, and praising good play. One research study showed that videotapes made before and after the children learned these skills showed in a very touching manner that, after training, they played together more and seemed much happier than they had been prior to training.

Special Times

 

Along with ensuring the child with autism is a fully integrated member of the family, it is important to remember that other children in a family need their times to be special. Families are often urged to find some regular, separate time for the children in their family who do not have autism. It may be one evening a week, a Saturday morning, or even a few minutes at bedtime each night. If your child with autism has a home-based program or exhibits serious management problems, you may have neither the stamina nor the energy to give your other child exactly the same amount of attention. It is not necessary that everything in childhood be exactly the same. What is important is the opportunity to feel special to your parents and to feel an overall atmosphere of equity in your home.

Not Everything as a Family

 

There are activities that should be shared by the entire family and those that should not. Along with having regularly scheduled special times for each child, it is also important to remember that there will be some events when one child in the family deserves to be the focus of everyone’s attention. Children have told us that it is sometimes frustrating to have to do everything with their brother or sister with autism. In fact, there may be times when it may not be fair to insist that he or she be included. For example, if your child with autism cannot sit still for a school play, then it may be better if he or she stays home while your other child performs.

Adult Siblings

 

Being the brother or sister of a person with autism does not end with childhood. This is a lifetime relationship that matures and grows over the years. The concerns of an adult sibling will be different from those of children. For the young adult, questions may focus on his/her own plans to have children and be concerned about whether there is a genetic component of their sibling’s autism. In some cases, young adults may also feel a keen sense of responsibility for their brother or sister with autism that makes it difficult for them to leave home and begin an independent life.

It is important that parents discuss with their adult children the expectations they have in caring for the person with autism, as well as reassuring them about the legitimacy of assuming their own role as adults.

The questions of the role of the adult child become most acute as parents age and begin to anticipate the point when they will no longer be able to continue to care for their child with autism. If the person with autism is not already living outside of the home, this may be a time when placement in a group home or supervised apartment becomes important. In families where such care is necessary, adult children and parents must together address the question of who will assume guardianship of the person with autism when the parents die.

It is not easy for any of us to talk about our own death, and both you and your child may shy away from the conversation. Nonetheless, your adult children need to understand the financial plans you have made, the care arrangements in place, and your own expectations for them. Having these difficult conversations will ultimately be a gift to your adult children who will knowthey can honor your wishes.

Most Siblings Cope Very Well

While growing up as the sibling of someone with autism can certainly be trying, most siblings cope very well. It is important to remember that while having a sibling with autism or any other disability is a challenge to a child, it is not an insurmountable obstacle. Most children handle the challenge effectively, and many of them respond with love, grace and humor far beyond their years.

Boy with autism attacked by bullies, left with nail embedded in his head

 

A boy with autism has been attacked by bullies after falling behind his family during a walk home.

Romeo Smith, nine, was with his family as they returned home from a visit with his grandmother when he was confronted by older boys waving sticks, The Mirrorreports.

The incident happened at Mansfield in Nottinghamshire in the UK.

Romeo was left with a nail embedded in his head after being attacked by bullies. Image: The Mega Agency

Terrified of being attacked, Romeo climbed a tree to try and escape.

When his parents noticed he’d fallen behind, father Craig, 35, went to find him and bring him home.

It was then that one of the boys threw an eight-inch piece of wood with a nail protruding from it, embedding it in his skull.

“It was terrible, mother Natasha Smith, 30, told The Mirror. “He was sat there waiting with a plank of wood sticking out of his head, like something out of a horror film.”

Romeo told The Mirror the experience was “scary”.

“When they threw the plank I could feel it stick in the back of my head.”

His mother said it’s hard for Romeo to talk about his feelings due to his autism but she can tell that the experience affected him, although he has tried to open up about this.

“I thought the worst and thought that I was dying,” he said.

“I have no idea how long the bullying has been going on but it is worrying that they have done this in front of an adult,” Smith told The Mirror.

“You wonder what else they are capable of?”

The boy is now recovering at home.

Nottinghamshire Police are still searching for the offenders however told the parents due to their age, they are unlikely to be prosecuted.

Typhoid fever

Typhoid fever is caused by Salmonella typhi bacteria. Typhoid fever is rare in industrialized countries. However, it remains a serious health threat in the developing world, especially for children.

Typhoid fever spreads through contaminated food and water or through close contact with someone who’s infected. Signs and symptoms usually include high fever, headache, abdominal pain, and either constipation or diarrhea.

Most people with typhoid fever feel better within a few days of starting antibiotic treatment, although a small number of them may die of complications. Vaccines against typhoid fever are available, but they’re only partially effective. Vaccines usually are reserved for those who may be exposed to the disease or are traveling to areas where typhoid fever is common.

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms are likely to develop gradually — often appearing one to three weeks after exposure to the disease.

Early illness

Once signs and symptoms do appear, you’re likely to experience:

  • Fever that starts low and increases daily, possibly reaching as high as 104.9 F (40.5 C)
  • Headache
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Muscle aches
  • Sweating
  • Dry cough
  • Loss of appetite and weight loss
  • Abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Rash
  • Extremely swollen abdomen

Later illness

If you don’t receive treatment, you may:

  • Become delirious
  • Lie motionless and exhausted with your eyes half-closed in what’s known as the typhoid state

In addition, life-threatening complications often develop at this time.

In some people, signs and symptoms may return up to two weeks after the fever has subsided.

When to see a doctor

See a doctor immediately if you suspect you have typhoid fever. If you become ill while traveling in a foreign country, call the U.S. Consulate for a list of doctors. Better yet, find out in advance about medical care in the areas you’ll visit, and carry a list of the names, addresses and phone numbers of recommended doctors.

If you develop signs and symptoms after you return home, consider consulting a doctor who focuses on international travel medicine or infectious diseases. A specialist may be able to recognize and treat your illness more quickly than can a doctor who isn’t familiar with these areas.

Causes

Typhoid fever is caused by virulent bacteria called Salmonella typhi (S. typhi). Although they’re related, S. typhi and the bacteria responsible for salmonellosis, another serious intestinal infection, aren’t the same.

Fecal-oral transmission route

The bacteria that cause typhoid fever spread through contaminated food or water and occasionally through direct contact with someone who is infected. In developing nations, where typhoid fever is endemic, most cases result from contaminated drinking water and poor sanitation. The majority of people in industrialized countries pick up typhoid bacteria while traveling and spread it to others through the fecal-oral route.

This means that S. typhi is passed in the feces and sometimes in the urine of infected people. You can contract the infection if you eat food handled by someone with typhoid fever who hasn’t washed carefully after using the toilet. You can also become infected by drinking water contaminated with the bacteria.

Typhoid carriers

Even after treatment with antibiotics, a small number of people who recover from typhoid fever continue to harbor the bacteria in their intestinal tracts or gallbladders, often for years. These people, called chronic carriers, shed the bacteria in their feces and are capable of infecting others, although they no longer have signs or symptoms of the disease themselves.

Risk factors

Typhoid fever remains a serious worldwide threat — especially in the developing world — affecting an estimated 26 million or more people each year. The disease is endemic in India, Southeast Asia, Africa, South America and many other areas.

Worldwide, children are at greatest risk of getting the disease, although they generally have milder symptoms than adults do.

If you live in a country where typhoid fever is rare, you’re at increased risk if you:

  • Work in or travel to areas where typhoid fever is endemic
  • Work as a clinical microbiologist handling Salmonella typhi bacteria
  • Have close contact with someone who is infected or has recently been infected with typhoid fever
  • Drink water contaminated by sewage that contains S.
  • Complications

    Intestinal bleeding or holes

    The most serious complications of typhoid fever — intestinal bleeding or holes (perforations) in the intestine — may develop in the third week of illness. A perforated intestine occurs when your small intestine or large bowel develops a hole, causing intestinal contents to leak into your abdominal cavity and triggering signs and symptoms, such as severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and bloodstream infection (sepsis). This life-threatening complication requires immediate medical care.

    Other, less common complications

    Other possible complications include:

    • Inflammation of the heart muscle (myocarditis)
    • Inflammation of the lining of the heart and valves (endocarditis)
    • Pneumonia
    • Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis)
    • Kidney or bladder infections
    • Infection and inflammation of the membranes and fluid surrounding your brain and spinal cord (meningitis)
    • Psychiatric problems, such as delirium, hallucinations and paranoid psychosis

    With prompt treatment, nearly all people in industrialized nations recover from typhoid fever. Without treatment, some people may not survive complications of the disease.

  • Preparing for your appointment

    Call your doctor if you’ve recently returned from travel abroad and develop mild symptoms similar to those that occur with typhoid fever. If your symptoms are severe, go to an emergency room or call 911 or your local emergency number.

    Here’s some information to help you get ready and know what to expect from your doctor.

    Information to gather in advance

    • Pre-appointment restrictions. At the time you make your appointment, ask if there are restrictions you need to follow in the time leading up to your visit. Your doctor will not be able to confirm typhoid fever without a blood test, and may recommend taking steps to reduce the risk of passing a possible contagious illness to others.
    • Symptom history. Write down any symptoms you’re experiencing and for how long.
    • Recent exposure to possible sources of infection. Be prepared to describe international trips in detail, including the countries you visited and the dates you traveled.
    • Medical history. Make a list of your key medical information, including other conditions for which you’re being treated and any medications, vitamins or supplements you’re taking. Your doctor will also need to know your vaccination history.
    • Questions to ask your doctor. Write down your questions in advance so that you can make the most of your time with your doctor.

    For typhoid fever, possible questions to ask your doctor include:

    • What are the possible causes for my symptoms?
    • What kinds of tests do I need?
    • Are treatments available to help me recover?
    • I have other health problems. How can I best manage these conditions together?
    • How long do you expect a full recovery will take?
    • When can I return to work or school?
    • Am I at risk of any long-term complications from typhoid fever?

    Don’t hesitate to ask any other related questions you have.

    What to expect from your doctor

    Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may reserve time to go over any points you want to talk about in-depth. Your doctor may ask:

    • What are your symptoms and when did they begin?
    • Have your symptoms gotten better or worse?
    • Did your symptoms briefly get better and then come back?
    • Have you recently traveled abroad? Where?
    • Did you update your vaccinations before traveling?
    • Are you being treated for any other medical conditions?
    • Are you currently taking any medications?
    • Tests and diagnosis

      Medical and travel history

      Your doctor is likely to suspect typhoid fever based on your symptoms and your medical and travel history. But the diagnosis is usually confirmed by identifying S. typhi in a culture of your blood or other body fluid or tissue.

      Body fluid or tissue culture

      For the culture, a small sample of your blood, stool, urine or bone marrow is placed on a special medium that encourages the growth of bacteria. The culture is checked under a microscope for the presence of typhoid bacteria. A bone marrow culture often is the most sensitive test for S. typhi.

      Although performing a culture test is the mainstay for diagnosis, in some instances other testing may be used to confirm a suspected typhoid fever infection, such as a test to detect antibodies to typhoid bacteria in your blood or a test that checks for typhoid DNA in your blood.

    • Treatments and drugs

      Antibiotic therapy is the only effective treatment for typhoid fever.

      Commonly prescribed antibiotics

      • Ciprofloxacin (Cipro). In the United States, doctors often prescribe this for nonpregnant adults.
      • Ceftriaxone (Rocephin). This injectable antibiotic is an alternative for people who may not be candidates for ciprofloxacin, such as children.

      These drugs can cause side effects, and long-term use can lead to the development of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria.

      Problems with antibiotic resistance

      In the past, the drug of choice was chloramphenicol. Doctors no longer commonly use it, however, because of side effects, a high rate of health deterioration after a period of improvement (relapse) and widespread bacterial resistance.

      In fact, the existence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a growing problem in the treatment of typhoid fever, especially in the developing world. In recent years, S. typhi also has proved resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ampicillin.

      Other treatments

      Other treatments include:

      • Drinking fluids. This helps prevent the dehydration that results from a prolonged fever and diarrhea. If you’re severely dehydrated, you may need to receive fluids through a vein (intravenously).
      • Surgery. If your intestines become perforated, you’ll need surgery to repair the hole.
      • Prevention

        In many developing nations, the public health goals that can help prevent and control typhoid fever — safe drinking water, improved sanitation and adequate medical care — may be difficult to achieve. For that reason, some experts believe that vaccinating high-risk populations is the best way to control typhoid fever.

        A vaccine is recommended if you’re traveling to areas where the risk of getting typhoid fever is high.

        Vaccines

        Two vaccines are available.

        • One is injected in a single dose at least one week before travel.
        • One is given orally in four capsules, with one capsule to be taken every other day.

        Neither vaccine is 100 percent effective, and both require repeat immunizations, as vaccine effectiveness diminishes over time.

        Because the vaccine won’t provide complete protection, follow these guidelines when traveling to high-risk areas:

        • Wash your hands. Frequent hand-washing in hot, soapy water is the best way to control infection. Wash before eating or preparing food and after using the toilet. Carry an alcohol-based hand sanitizer for times when water isn’t available.
        • Avoid drinking untreated water. Contaminated drinking water is a particular problem in areas where typhoid fever is endemic. For that reason, drink only bottled water or canned or bottled carbonated beverages, wine and beer. Carbonated bottled water is safer than uncarbonated bottled water is.

          Ask for drinks without ice. Use bottled water to brush your teeth, and try not to swallow water in the shower.

        • Avoid raw fruits and vegetables. Because raw produce may have been washed in unsafe water, avoid fruits and vegetables that you can’t peel, especially lettuce. To be absolutely safe, you may want to avoid raw foods entirely.
        • Choose hot foods. Avoid food that’s stored or served at room temperature. Steaming hot foods are best. And although there’s no guarantee that meals served at the finest restaurants are safe, it’s best to avoid food from street vendors — it’s more likely to be contaminated.

        Prevent infecting others

        If you’re recovering from typhoid fever, these measures can help keep others safe:

        • Take your antibiotics. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking your antibiotics, and be sure to finish the entire prescription.
        • Wash your hands often. This is the single most important thing you can do to keep from spreading the infection to others. Use hot, soapy water and scrub thoroughly for at least 30 seconds, especially before eating and after using the toilet.
        • Avoid handling food. Avoid preparing food for others until your doctor says you’re no longer contagious. If you work in the food service industry or a health care facility, you won’t be allowed to return to work until tests show that you’re no longer shedding typhoid bacteria.

Good Step by Punjab Govt

 

 

 

Punjab Food Authority (PFA) is fairly active these days. Other than banning certain food items in school canteens, the authority is also campaigning actively against food items which either cause harm or do not contain any nutritional value, especially for children.

In its most recent public awareness message, PFA informs that a recent government survey shows that 44 percent children in Pakistan suffer from lack of proper nutrition. In its campaign to inform parents about adequate diet and healthy food items for kids, PFA said that instant drinks are bad for growing children.

Instant drinks are those which come in powdered form and are mixed with water. According to PFA, Tang, Mixer Star, Sunsip Limupani, Fruitly and any other similar drinks are completely artificial.

Such drinks make use of artificial flavors and colors. One can only obtain calories from such food items as they lack “Original Fruit Content” and any other nutritional content.
The authority recommends that parents should avoid such drinks which have no nutritional value and instead choose fruit juices, flavored milk, milk shakes, etc. for better physical and mental health of their children
Continue reading Good Step by Punjab Govt

What are kidney stones?

kidney stones on x-ray

The cause of most stones is unknown, but they can be associated with a high concentration of calcium in the urine or occasionally in the blood.

They can also be caused by Dehydration, infection, obstruction of urine and various kidney disorders.

Crystals of salts found normally in the urine aggregate together and gradually enlarge in size to form stones, which may vary greatly in size. Some are as small as a grain of sand whereas others are so big they fill the entire renal pelvis.

Kidney stones typically occur in healthy men aged between 30 and 50. The male to female ratio for kidney stone disease is 4:1.

Patients who have had stones before are more at risk of further stones and sometimes the problem runs in families.

What are the symptoms of kidney stones?

  • Kidney stones may cause sudden, intense pain. If the stone travels down the ureter (the tube leading from the kidney to the bladder) it may get stuck at one of several points. The pain that this causes is usually concentrated on one side of the back but may also move into the stomach or down to the groin where it can result in colicky pains. The same type of pain may also be caused by bleeding or infection in the urinary system.
  • Kidney stone attacks can be so painful they cause great distress to the sufferer. The pain is often accompanied by nausea and vomiting.
  • They may cause scratches in the lining (mucosa) of the renal pelvis or the ureter. This leads to blood in the urine. There is not always enough to be seen with the naked eye but a diagnostic test can detect it.
  • Frequent infections in the urinary system may be a sign of kidney stones.

What should you do if you have an attack?

If you have a kidney stone attack, you may need medical help to ease the pain if simple painkillers (for example ibuprofen) are not helpful.

If you have never had a stone before, investigations will be necessary to make a diagnosis because other serious abdominal problems may cause similar pain.

Stones less than 5mm are very likely to pass out of the ureter spontaneously.

Once the stone reaches the bladder, it normally passes out of the body in the urine without further problems and often without you even being aware of it.

Larger stones may not pass on their own and may need an operation to remove them.

The doctor may want to see the stones. They are obviously difficult to catch but one solution is to try urinating through a sieve or through a coffee filter paper.

Will you need to go to hospital?

If the kidney stone is so big that it cannot come out by itself or the pain continues, it will be necessary to go to hospital.

In the past X-ray or ultrasound were used but it is becoming more common to use a CT scan to diagnose the problem.

CT is very good at showing the size of the stone and where it is situated. This is important because it helps doctors decide how, and when, the stone should be removed. If the stone is small and lying close to the bladder, it may be left to pass on its own.

There are many modern methods of removing stones that involve passing a small telescope via the bladder through which a variety of stone disintegrators can be used. Most commonly lasers are now used to fragment the stone.

Occasionally, a small opening is made directly into the kidney for large stones. It is very rare nowadays for patients to need open surgery.

What is lithotripsy?

Lithotripsy uses shockwave therapy to break up kidney stones. The treatment is performed in hospital using special equipment and is becoming more and more common.

The stone is fragmented into pieces by the treatment and these smaller pieces can then pass out of the body unaided in the urine.

If the stone is larger than 1 cm, then more than one treatment session may be required.

Foods to eat while in diabetes

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can’t have.While it’s certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it’s just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they’re packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they’re exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks.

Continue reading Foods to eat while in diabetes

7 Natural Remedies For Joint Pain

Natural Remedies For Joint Pain

When joint pain flares up, you want relief—fast. But you might not want to pop a pain reliever, especially if you’re concerned about side effects or interactions with other drugs. Or maybe meds alone aren’t doing enough, so you’re looking to add a drug-free remedy to your arsenal. Ice and heat are great, but they’re not your only options. Here are 7 more natural ways to fight inflammation and ease your ache. (The Power Nutrient Solution is the first-ever plan that tackles the root cause of virtually every major ailment and health condition today; get your copy now!)

Stick a pin in it

The scientific proof that acupuncture improves osteoarthritis pain is a little iffy. (Studies have been mixed, and it’s hard to rule out the placebo effect.) But a 2013 research review did conclude that there’s some evidence that this alternative treatment improves pain and stiffness in people with fibromyalgia(an arthritis-like condition characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain). So if you’re not averse to needles, book a few sessions. Just remember that frequent visits may be needed before you see results, and most insurance plans won’t cover it, says Sheryl Mascarenhas, MD, an assistant professor of rheumatology at The Ohio State University. (See what else acupuncture can treat.)

MORE: 11 Effective Solutions For Sciatic Nerve Pain

Take to the water.
Take to the water

Swimming, water aerobics, and other aquatic activities “promote flexibility and strength without high impact,” says Mark Karadsheh, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at the William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, MI. A 2014 review in the journal Physical Therapy found that exercising in water reduces pain and improves physical functioning in people with osteoarthritis of the lower limbs. Meanwhile, a 2015 study from The Netherlands found that a 45-minute aquatic circuit training session helped relieve the pain of knee osteoarthritis.

Spice things up.
Spice things up

Capsaicin, a substance responsible for the heat in hot peppers, is also used in topical pain-relieving creams and ointments. “It temporarily uses up substance P [a brain chemical that stimulates pain receptors], which redirects nerves so you don’t feel pain in the joint,” explains Mascarenhas, who notes that it can provide significant relief. In fact, a study from Case Western Reserve University found that 80% of people with osteo or rheumatoid arthritis had less pain after applying capsaicin cream four times a day for 2 weeks.

Consider supplements.
Consider supplements
Consider supplements.

Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate (both found in human cartilage) are popular for treating the pain and swelling associated with osteoarthritis. Studies on their effectiveness have been mixed, but a 2015 research review determined that this combo significantly reduces pain and improves functioning in people with osteoarthritis of the knee. “There’s no risk associated with taking them so they’re worth a shot,” says Karadsheh.

Go fish.
Go fish

It’s no secret that omega-3 fatty acids, including fish oil supplements, have anti-inflammatory properties. It turns out these supplements also could help aching joints feel better. A 2015 study from Thailand found that when people with osteoarthritis of the knee took 1,000 mg of fish oil supplements (a combination of EPA, or eicosapentaenoic acid, and DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid) once a day for 8 weeks, their pain decreased and their functioning improved significantly. Other research has found that getting more omega-3s enabled people with rheumatoid arthritis to reduce their reliance on NSAIDs.

Embrace an ancient martial art.
Embrace an ancient martial art

Practicing tai chi is a low-impact way to strengthen the muscles around your joints and increase your range of motion, says Karadsheh. A 2013 review of seven randomized controlled trials found that a 12-week tai chi program improves symptoms of pain, stiffness, and physical function in peopl

Lower abdominal pain in women

All women will experience pain in the lower abdomen from time to time. Most commonly this can occur due to their periods or menstruation.

In many cases it is difficult to diagnose the exact cause of the pain, but noting certain features will help your doctor come to a diagnosis.

The most common causes are a urinary disorder, such as bladder or kidneyproblems, a bowel problem or a problem with the reproductive system – the uterus, Fallopian tubes and ovaries.

Abdominal pain arising from the urinary system

Urine infections are common and present symptoms, such as burning when you pass urine and going to the toilet more often.

Infection can spread to the kidneys (pyelonephritis) and can make you feel unwell with a high temperature and back pain.

If you have pain that spreads from your back down to your groin and is severe – your doctor may be more concerned that you have kidney stones. The doctor will test your urine if you have any of the above symptoms.

If you have any blood in your urine, it’s important to tell the doctor because this always needs investigation.

Tumours of the urinary system are not common, and the doctor will certainly take into account the duration of your symptoms first.

Abdominal pain arising from the digestive system

Pain arising from the large intestine is a particularly common cause of lower abdominal pain in both men and women. Features suggesting your pain may be to do with the bowel are:

  • Pain associated with pooing
  • A change in bowel habit
  • Loss of blood when you poo
  • Bloating with wind

Both constipation and diarrhoea can give you pain.

The pain they are often associated with is described as crampy or ‘colicky.’ This means that it comes and goes in waves. Large bowel pain is characteristically relieved on opening the bowels. Potential causes of pain arising from the bowel include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which can give you alternating diarrhoea, constipation and bloating. Other conditions include diverticular disease and it’s complications which are more frequent in older patients. Inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s). A rare but important diagnosis is colorectal cancer.

Bloating and swelling is also a common symptom that people report and can be due to a problem affecting the bowels.

If you have any fresh bleeding from your back passage or you notice that your poo is black in colour then your should alert your doctor. These symptoms require investigation.Woman having her stomach examined by doctor

Abdominal pain arising from the reproductive organs

Pain can originate from your uterus (womb), Fallopian tubes or ovaries. It’s usually felt in the middle of the lower abdomen.

Pain that is felt more to the side can be more typical of a pain coming from the ovary.

Pain coming from the uterus is often worse during your period and is called dysmenorrhoea.

Some conditions affecting the reproductive system can also cause pain during intercourse. This is called dyspareunia and it is important to let your doctor know if you are troubled by it.

Examples of conditions of the reproductive organs include endometriosis, fibroids, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts and problems related to the early stage of pregnancy such as a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy.

What will the doctor do?

The doctor will ask lots of questions regarding your periods, passing of urine and bowel movements. They may also ask about general symptoms such as fever, nausea and vomiting.

If appropriate, they may ask questions about a person’s emotional life-family, home, work and sex life.

Next the doctor will examine you. They will examine your abdomen and may examine you internally also (vaginal, rectal or sometimes both) may be necessary.

Often the doctor will ask for you to give a urine sample, which can be tested for infection.

If you have symptoms of vaginal discharge or other related symptoms the doctor may take some vaginal swabs.

Depending on your symptoms and their duration the doctor may decide to arrange for further investigations.

These may include:

  • Gynaecological causes may require vaginal swabs, cervical smears or pelvic ultrasound examination. Ultrasound may also be performed from within the vagina. Specialised blood test for ovarian cancer, CA-125, are usually performed. More invasive tests will depend upon the doctor’s suspicion of the cause of the pain.
  • Urinary causes can be investigated by urine culture, ultrasound or CT scan.
  • Colonic causes may require internal endoscopic examination of the bowel by Flexible Sigmoidoscopy or Colonoscopy.
  • A CT (Computerised Tomography Scan) may be appropriate for all three major sites of pain.

To determine how far to investigate lower abdominal pain takes skill and judgement. Pain can even arise outside the abdomen, for example from the back. Depending on the exact symptoms and duration, possible referral to the appropriate specialist is often required.

Other people also read:

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): what are the symptoms of IBS?

Lumbago (lower back pain): what are the danger signs?

Vaginal discharge: what can the doctor do?

Based on a text by Dr Erik Fangel Poulsen, specialist