120 Zero Carb foods+Atkins+Induction and Ketosis+Food log tips+Printable list 4 day No Carb Meal Plan

Almost Zero Carb Food List

Seize the Way |

Imagine a zero carb world where nervous carb counting doesn’t exist.

If you’re starting low carb, speeding up ketosis or in Atkins Induction, no carb foods will set you free.

  • Tips for going zero carb
  • How to read no carb food labels
  • Real life zero carb food experience and 6 week food log
  • Printable list of no carb foods
  • Almost zero carb meal plan

The list of low carb foods is HUGE. Zero carb foods are more limited, especially in the fruit and veggie area. But there are still over 100 choices for richly satisfying meals.

 

no carb food list mushroom cap

Finding foods with zero carbs isn’t hard (anymore.)

Use our zero carb and (almost) zero carb food lists, read package labels carefully and be pleasantly surprised at all the options.

 

Using the No Carb Foods List

Technically speaking, fats are the only foods that are completely zero carb. Even meats and seafood have trace amounts.

What You Must Know:

The foods on this list have very minor amounts of net carbs – fractions of a gram. These foods are so close to zero, most low carbers consider them ‘no carb foods.’

The “almost” zero carb foods are a bit higher, but a single serving from the list is still under 1 net carb.

One Warning:

Track your servings. Trace amounts of carbs still add up.

 

Tips for Going Zero Carb

You’ve decided to go low – really low. These three easy tips simplify starting your zero carb diet.

 

Give yourself a few days to prepare.

Check your fridge and cabinets, move any higher carb foods to the side, and fill the space with your favorite no carb foods.

Plan a zero carb grocery trip and stock up!

 

Focus on what you ARE allowed to eat.

Zero carb foods are savory and delicious. You won’t feel like you’re depriving yourself.

 

Have fun. Try new things.

If you are eating foods with no carbs, you are cooking more often. Having some fun with your food is a good way to build positive associations.

 

Real Life Zero Carb Food Log

What’s it really like to go zero carb? Rebecca Latham of Low Carb Better Health went zero carb, keeping food logs for six weeks:

Rebecca-zero-carb-foods    I am eating meat, a small amount of dairy, some healthy fats and I am drinking water only.

I have also been eating Fat Bombs, which contain almond butter, cocoa power and Stevia.

I am carefully tracking what I am eating. Here is what I have learned so far about how my blood sugar reacts to food.

 

No Carb Food Labels

Many food labels list foods as having zero carbs. Labeling laws allow food companies to print “zero grams” on the label if the food has less than one gram of carbs.

Sugar substitutes, cheeses, eggs and spices are common examples of this situation. If you’re being extra cautious, count them as .5 net carbs per serving.

 

List of Foods with No Carbs

There are zero carb foods in almost every food group, so it’s easy to enjoy a variety of foods when going no carb.

Select the image to view, print or save. Opens in a new window.

printable list of foods with no carbs

 

Zero Carb Meat

High in protein and vitamins, most natural meats have zero carbs.

Packaged, cured and processed meats (sausage, hot dogs, deli meat, bacon, etc.) have some carbs due to added flavoring, preservatives or starchy binders.

Be sure to check the labels.

These natural meats have no carbs:

  • Beef
  • Veal
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Fowl (turkey, chicken, duck, goose, hen, quail)
  • Organ Meats (brains, tongue, liver, heart, kidneys)
  • Game Meats (venison, bison, ostrich, caribou, elk)
  • Exotic Meats (such as ostrich and emu)

 

Zero Carb Bacon Bars

bbacon meat bar keto snack

Zero carb, game-changing Epic Bacon Bars let you “Enter bacon bliss… Indulge in bacon lust freely and frequently.” (100% natural)

 

Zero Carb Seafood

Fresh (unprocessed) seafood is zero carb:

  • Cod
  • Flounder
  • Sole
  • Haddock
  • Halibut
  • Sardine
  • Swordfish
  • Tuna
  • Trout
  • Salmon
  • Catfish
  • Bass

These options have trace carbs:

  • Crab
  • Shrimp
  • Lobster
  • Squid

These options have a bit more:

  • Oysters (count .35 net carbs per oyster)
  • Mussels (count .38 net carbs per mussel)
  • Clams (count .35 net carbs per clam)

 

Zero Carb Seasoning

Flavoring zero carb foods makes them much more palatable.

  • Salt and Pepper
  • Vinegar
  • Ground Cinnamon
  • Most Hot Sauces
  • Pre-mixed Seasonings (check the label)
  • Yellow Mustard
  • Dill weed
  • Chives, Basil, Oregano, Rosemary, Thyme, etc.

 

Zero Carb Oils and Fats

The following fats and oils have zero carbs:

  • Olive oil
  • Coconut oil
  • Grass-fed butter
  • Walnut Oil
  • MCT oil
  • Avocado oil
  • Fish oil
  • Animal Fats (including lard)

Less healthy oils:

  • Mayonnaise (check each label)
  • Vegetable Shortening
  • Sesame oil

 

Organic Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is high in Medium Chain Triglycerides, or (MCT) fatty acids. These fats are metabolized differently.

Coconut oil is used immediately for energy – not stored.

Organic Coconut Oil

Carrington farms organic coconut oil is gluten free, non-GMO, free of hydrogenated and trans fats, Kosher and zero carb.

 

High Performance MCT Oil

bulletproof coffee best MCT Oil

 

Left Coast’s pure MCT oil blend is easier to absorb and digest.

MCT converts into energy faster than other oils, ignites your body’s metabolic rate and helps maintain healthy levels of cholesterol.

 

Zero Carb Binders

Unflavored, powdered gelatin is a high protein, zero carb food. Gelatin strengthens hair and nails, helps skin stay elastic and helps with sleep.

Low carb guru, Dana Carpender has excellent ideas for adding gelatin:

Dana Carpender zero carb foods    “I intend to start adding gelatin to things, too. In particular, I plan to mix gelatin into ground meat dishes, from burgers to meat loaves to chili.

Why not? It’s flavorless. I’m betting in the burgers and meat loaves it holds moisture, and acts as a binder.

I’ve also started adding pork rind crumbs to a lot of ground meat recipes, not only for flavor, but for the gelatin.”

– from Hold The Toast “Gelatin Blowing My Mind”)

Use zero carb gelatin as a binder for ground meat, or add to lemonade for a filling, protein boost.

 

Zero Carb Beverages

These beverages are zero carb:

  • Water
  • Sparkling Water
  • Club Soda
  • Coffee
  • Tea
  • Diet Soda (watch the artificial sweetener)

 

Zero Carb Sweeteners

Companies advertise aspartame, sucralose, saccharine and stevia as no carb sugar substitutes. However – the powder and granular ones usually contain trace amounts of carbohydrate fillers.

It only takes a little to go a long way. Use a sprinkle.

Note: Artificial sweeteners can affect insulin the same way sugar does, so watch your progress, use sparingly and with caution.

 

Liquid De-Bittered Stevia

EZ-Sweetz’s de-bittered stevia blend has no unpleasant aftertaste. This blend has none of the characteristic bitterness of typical stevia sweeteners.

EZ-Sweetz Liquid De-Bittered Stevia

 

Zero Carb Alcohol

Use alcohol with caution. Your body burns alcohol before it burns fat for fuel. When you have metabolized all the alcohol, your body will return to burning fat.

Alcohol knocks some low carbers out of ketosis for several days after drinking alcohol. Everyone is different, so watch your progress and adjust if necessary.

  • Gin
  • Rum (unflavored)
  • Vodka (unflavored)
  • Whiskey
  • Tequila
  • Scotch

 

zero carb food greens cheese seeds

(Almost) Zero Carb Foods

This list of almost zero carb foods really expands your options without compromising your plan.

A single serving of these foods contains less than 1 net carb. Measure carefully and spread your extra carbs throughout the day.

 

Almost Zero Fruits and Veggies

Many of the leafy green vegetables (spinach, lettuce, celery, kale, turnip greens) are great choices for going zero carb.

Although commonly thought of as vegetables, avocados are fruit, almost zero carb and a source of healthy fat.

Raspberries are high in fiber and are great to sprinkle over a salad or top with whipped cream.

 

Serving size: 1/2 cup

  • Spinach .2
  • Parsley .4
  • Avocado .5
  • Radish .5
  • Lettuce .25
  • Bok Choy .7
  • Celery .8

Serving size: 1/4 cup

  • Mushrooms .5
  • Garlic (1/2 clove) .5
  • Pokeberry Shoots .5
  • Cabbage .5
  • Asparagus (3 pieces) .6
  • Coconut .5
  • Yellow Squash .7
  • Raspberries .7
  • Cauliflower .7
  • Broccoli .8
  • Cucumber .9

 

Almost Zero Eggs and Dairy

Eggs

Eggs are so versatile: fried, scrambled, omelets, quiche, boiled, deviled and of course – egg salad.

  • Eggs  .2 to .7 per egg (check the carton)

Eggs are almost zero carb, ranging from .2 to 1 net carb per egg. Organic, free-range, cage-free, etc. eggs have larger yolks, making them lower in carbs. Be sure to check each carton.

 

Heavy Cream

Most heavy whipping cream brands have less than 1 carb per tablespoon, even if the packaging declares “0 carbs.”

Check labels carefully – each brand of cream is very different.

  • Heavy Cream  .4 net carbs per tablespoon.
  • Half-and-Half  .2 to 1 net carb per tablespoon.

 

Almost Zero Cheese

Most natural, unprocessed cheeses (no added flavors or ingredients) are 0 to 1 net carb per serving. Hard cheeses will be the lowest; softer, creamy cheeses will be the highest.

The following cheeses and net carb amounts are from FatSecret, Popular Cheeses. When in doubt, check each label.

 

Serving size: 1 oz = 1″ cube = 1/4 cup grated (approx.)

  • Asiago .9
  • Blue .6
  • Brie .1
  • Camembert .1
  • Cheddar .3
  • Colby .7
  • Edam .4
  • Fontina .4
  • Goats .6
  • Gouda .6
  • Gruyère .1
  • Havarti .7
  • Mexican Blend Cheese .5
  • Monterey .1
  • Mozzarella .6
  • Muenster .3
  • Neufchatel .1 to .8
  • Parmesan .9
  • Provolone .6
  • Ricotta .8

* This list goes on and on… Be adventurous and try something new!

 

Almost Zero Carb Meal Plan

The Almost Zero meal plan is three easy days, one aggressive technique and major fat loss.

inside almost zero carb meal plan

The plan is designed to break even the worst stall, and burn off large amounts of stored fat – in 3 days.

  • The Technique
  • 150 Recipes (100 under 1 net carb)
  • Sample Menus, Shopping List
  • Printable Planner

If what you’re doing isn’t working, get your meal plan now.

 

Almost Zero Carb Food List

 

Source

One Minute Ketogenic Cheesecake

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 2 Tbsp heavy cream
  • 1 egg
  • ½ tsp lemon juice
  • ¼ tsp vanilla
  • 2-4 Tbsp sugar substitute such as powdered erythritol or stevia (mix two or more for a better flavor)

Combine all ingredients in a 1.5 cup microwave-safe bowl, and whisk until smooth. Place in microwave and cook on high for 90 seconds, stirring every 30 seconds to remix ingredients. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Excellent topped with fresh fruit and whipped cream, or a homemade low carb chocolate sauce. (Count extra carbs if additions are made).

Nutrition info per one-cup serving. Calories: 300, Fat: 27.6 grams, Carbohydrates: 2.5 grams, Fiber: 0 grams, Net Carbohydrates: 2.5 grams, Protein: 11 grams.

ADHD in Adults

Image result for adhd symptoms in adults checklist

ADHD Symptom Snapshot

There are 3 core symptoms of ADHD: inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. The following are examples of how ADHD symptoms may appear in adults.

Only a doctor or other health care professional can diagnose ADHD.

ONLY A DOCTOR OR OTHER HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL CAN DIAGNOSE ADHD

Symptoms of Inattention

  • Often makes careless mistakes and lacks attention to details
    (Examples: overlooking or missing details or handing in work that is inaccurate)
  • Often has difficulty paying attention to tasks
    (Example: difficulty remaining focused during lectures, conversations, or lengthy readings)
  • Often seems to not listen when spoken to directly
    (Example: mind seems elsewhere, even in the absence of obvious distraction)
  • Often fails to follow through on instructions, chores, or duties in the workplace
    (Example: starts tasks but quickly loses focus and is easily sidetracked)
  • Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
    (Examples: messy, disorganized work; poor time management; fails to meet deadlines)
  • Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to participate in tasks requiring sustained mental effort, like preparing reports, completing forms, or reviewing lengthy papers 
  • Often loses things like tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, and mobile phones
  • Often easily distracted by other things, including unrelated thoughts
  • Often forgetful in daily activities, such as running errands, returning calls, paying bills, and keeping appointments

Symptoms of Hyperactivity and Impulsivity

  • Often fidgets with or taps hands and feet or squirms in seat
  • Often leaves seat when remaining seated is expected
    (Example: leaves their place in the office or other workplace setting or in other situations that require remaining seated)
  • Often runs or climbs where it is inappropriate or feels restless (in adults, may be limited to feeling restless)
  • Often unable to participate in leisure activities quietly
  • Often acts as if “on the go” or “driven by a motor”
    (Example: is unable to be or uncomfortable being still for an extended time, as in meetings or restaurants)
  • Often talks excessively
  • Often blurts out an answer before a question has been fully asked
    (Examples: completes people’s sentences; cannot wait for next turn in conversation)
  • Often has difficulty waiting his or her turn, for example, while waiting in line
  • Often interrupts or intrudes on others
    (Examples: butts into conversations, games, or activities; may start using other people’s things without asking or receiving permission; may intrude into or take over what others are doing)

Europe’s most dangerous pathogens: Climate change increasing risks

Image result for lyme disease

Europe’s most dangerous pathogens: Climate change increasing risks

Date:
August 2, 2017
Source:
University of Liverpool
Summary:
The impact of climate change on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases could be greater than previously thought, according to new research.

The impact of climate change on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases could be greater than previously thought, according to new research by the University of Liverpool.

The study, published in Scientific Reports, is the first large-scale assessment of how climate affects bacterium, viruses or other microorganisms and parasites (pathogens) that can cause disease in humans or animals in Europe.

The results will help policy makers prioritise the surveillance for pathogens that may respond to climate change and, in turn, contribute to strengthening climate change resilience for infectious diseases.

Epidemics

There is growing evidence that climate change is altering the distribution of some diseases, in some cases causing epidemics or making diseases spread within their natural range, for example, Zika virus in South America, or bluetongue and Schmallenberg disease in livestock in Europe.

Dr Marie McIntyre, who led the project at the University’s Institute of Infection and Global Health, explained: “Although there is a well-established link between climate change and infectious disease, we did not previously understand how big the effects will be and which diseases will be most affected.

“Climate sensitivity of pathogens is a key indicator that diseases might respond to climate change, so assessing which pathogens are most climate-sensitive, and their characteristics, is vital information if we are to prepare for the future.”

Largest effects

The researchers carried out a systematic review of published literature on one hundred human and one hundred domestic animal pathogens present in Europe that have the largest impact on health.

Nearly two-thirds of the pathogens examined were found to be sensitive to climate; and two-thirds of these have more than one climate driver, meaning that the impact of climate change upon them will likely be multifaceted and complex.

Diseases spread by insects and ticks (vector-borne diseases) were found to be the most climate sensitive, followed by those transmitted in soil, water and food. The diseases with the largest number of different climate drivers were Vibrio cholerae (cause of cholera), Fasciola hepatica (cause of liver fluke), Bacillus anthracis (cause of anthrax) and Borrelia burgdorferi (cause of tickborne Lyme disease).

Future effects

Dr Marie McIntyre, commented: “Currently, most models examining climate effects only consider a single or at most two climate drivers, so our results suggest that this should change if we really want to understand future impacts of climate change on health.”

Zoonotic pathogens — those that spread from animals to humans — were also found to be more climate sensitive than those that affect only humans or only animals. As 75% of emerging diseases are zoonotic, emerging diseases may be particularly likely to be impacted by climate change.

However, the researchers stress that their response to climate change will also be dependent on the impacts of other drivers, such as changes to travel and trade, land-use, deforestation, new control measures and the development of antimicrobial resistance.

Big Data

The top 100 human and animals list was compiled using the Enhanced Infectious Disease Database (EID2), — a comprehensive and open-access ‘Big Data’ record of over 60 million scientific papers, electronic sources and textbooks associated with infectious diseases that was developed in Liverpool.


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of LiverpoolNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

Lower abdominal pain in women

All women will experience pain in the lower abdomen from time to time. Most commonly this can occur due to their periods or menstruation.

In many cases it is difficult to diagnose the exact cause of the pain, but noting certain features will help your doctor come to a diagnosis.

The most common causes are a urinary disorder, such as bladder or kidneyproblems, a bowel problem or a problem with the reproductive system – the uterus, Fallopian tubes and ovaries.

Abdominal pain arising from the urinary system

Urine infections are common and present symptoms, such as burning when you pass urine and going to the toilet more often.

Infection can spread to the kidneys (pyelonephritis) and can make you feel unwell with a high temperature and back pain.

If you have pain that spreads from your back down to your groin and is severe – your doctor may be more concerned that you have kidney stones. The doctor will test your urine if you have any of the above symptoms.

If you have any blood in your urine, it’s important to tell the doctor because this always needs investigation.

Tumours of the urinary system are not common, and the doctor will certainly take into account the duration of your symptoms first.

Abdominal pain arising from the digestive system

Pain arising from the large intestine is a particularly common cause of lower abdominal pain in both men and women. Features suggesting your pain may be to do with the bowel are:

  • Pain associated with pooing
  • A change in bowel habit
  • Loss of blood when you poo
  • Bloating with wind

Both constipation and diarrhoea can give you pain.

The pain they are often associated with is described as crampy or ‘colicky.’ This means that it comes and goes in waves. Large bowel pain is characteristically relieved on opening the bowels. Potential causes of pain arising from the bowel include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which can give you alternating diarrhoea, constipation and bloating. Other conditions include diverticular disease and it’s complications which are more frequent in older patients. Inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s). A rare but important diagnosis is colorectal cancer.

Bloating and swelling is also a common symptom that people report and can be due to a problem affecting the bowels.

If you have any fresh bleeding from your back passage or you notice that your poo is black in colour then your should alert your doctor. These symptoms require investigation.Woman having her stomach examined by doctor

Abdominal pain arising from the reproductive organs

Pain can originate from your uterus (womb), Fallopian tubes or ovaries. It’s usually felt in the middle of the lower abdomen.

Pain that is felt more to the side can be more typical of a pain coming from the ovary.

Pain coming from the uterus is often worse during your period and is called dysmenorrhoea.

Some conditions affecting the reproductive system can also cause pain during intercourse. This is called dyspareunia and it is important to let your doctor know if you are troubled by it.

Examples of conditions of the reproductive organs include endometriosis, fibroids, pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian cysts and problems related to the early stage of pregnancy such as a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy.

What will the doctor do?

The doctor will ask lots of questions regarding your periods, passing of urine and bowel movements. They may also ask about general symptoms such as fever, nausea and vomiting.

If appropriate, they may ask questions about a person’s emotional life-family, home, work and sex life.

Next the doctor will examine you. They will examine your abdomen and may examine you internally also (vaginal, rectal or sometimes both) may be necessary.

Often the doctor will ask for you to give a urine sample, which can be tested for infection.

If you have symptoms of vaginal discharge or other related symptoms the doctor may take some vaginal swabs.

Depending on your symptoms and their duration the doctor may decide to arrange for further investigations.

These may include:

  • Gynaecological causes may require vaginal swabs, cervical smears or pelvic ultrasound examination. Ultrasound may also be performed from within the vagina. Specialised blood test for ovarian cancer, CA-125, are usually performed. More invasive tests will depend upon the doctor’s suspicion of the cause of the pain.
  • Urinary causes can be investigated by urine culture, ultrasound or CT scan.
  • Colonic causes may require internal endoscopic examination of the bowel by Flexible Sigmoidoscopy or Colonoscopy.
  • A CT (Computerised Tomography Scan) may be appropriate for all three major sites of pain.

To determine how far to investigate lower abdominal pain takes skill and judgement. Pain can even arise outside the abdomen, for example from the back. Depending on the exact symptoms and duration, possible referral to the appropriate specialist is often required.

Other people also read:

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): what are the symptoms of IBS?

Lumbago (lower back pain): what are the danger signs?

Vaginal discharge: what can the doctor do?

Based on a text by Dr Erik Fangel Poulsen, specialist

Vaccines for adults: Which do you need?

Vaccines offer protection from infectious diseases. Find out how to stay on top of the vaccines recommended for adults.

You’re not a kid anymore, so you don’t have to worry about shots, right? Wrong. Find out how to stay on top of your vaccines.

What vaccines do adults need?

Vaccines for adults are recommended based on your age, prior vaccinations, health, lifestyle, occupation and travel destinations.

The schedule is updated every year, and changes range from the addition of a new vaccine to tweaks of current recommendations. To determine exactly which vaccines you need now and which vaccines are coming up, check the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

What factors might affect my vaccine recommendations?

Several factors can affect whether you need certain vaccines. Be sure to tell your doctor if you:

  • Are planning to travel abroad
  • Have had your spleen removed
  • Work in certain occupations where exposures could occur
  • Are or might be pregnant
  • Are breast-feeding
  • Are moderately or severely ill or have a chronic illness
  • Have any severe allergies, including a serious allergic reaction to a previous dose of a vaccine
  • Have had a disorder in which your body’s immune system attacks your nerves, such as Guillain-Barre syndrome
  • Have a weakened immune system or are being treated with an immunosuppressant
  • Have recently had another vaccine
  • Have recently had a transfusion or received other blood products
  • Have a personal or family history of seizures

Your doctor might also recommend certain vaccines based on your sexual activity. Vaccinations can protect you from hepatitis A and hepatitis B, serious liver infections that can spread through sexual contact. The HPV vaccine is recommended for men up to age 21 and women up to age 26.

Why are some vaccines particularly important for adults?

Adults of any age can benefit from vaccines. However, certain diseases, such as the flu, can be particularly serious for older adults or those living with certain chronic illnesses.

How can I keep track of my vaccines?

To gather information about your vaccination status, talk to your parents or other caregivers. Check with your doctor’s office, as well as any previous doctors’ offices, schools and employers. Some states also have registries that include adult immunizations. To check, contact your state health department.

If you can’t find your records, talk to your doctor. He or she might be able to do blood tests to see if you are immune to certain diseases that can be prevented by vaccines. You might need to get some vaccines again.

To stay on top of your vaccines, ask your doctor for an immunization record form. Bring the form with you to all of your doctor visits and ask your provider to sign and date the form for each vaccine you receive.

Dyslexia-Symptoms and treatment

Symptoms

Signs of dyslexia can be difficult to recognize before your child enters school, but some early clues may indicate a problem. Once your child reaches school age, your child’s teacher may be the first to notice a problem. Severity varies, but the condition often becomes apparent as a child starts learning to read.

Before school

Signs that a young child may be at risk of dyslexia include:

  • Late talking
  • Learning new words slowly
  • Problems forming words correctly, such as reversing sounds in words or confusing words that sound alike
  • Problems remembering or naming letters, numbers and colors
  • Difficulty learning nursery rhymes or playing rhyming games

School age

Once your child is in school, dyslexia signs and symptoms may become more apparent, including:

  • Reading well below the expected level for age
  • Problems processing and understanding what he or she hears
  • Difficulty finding the right word or forming answers to questions
  • Problems remembering the sequence of things
  • Difficulty seeing (and occasionally hearing) similarities and differences in letters and words
  • Inability to sound out the pronunciation of an unfamiliar word
  • Difficulty spelling
  • Spending an unusually long time completing tasks that involve reading or writing
  • Avoiding activities that involve reading

Teens and adults

Dyslexia signs in teens and adults are similar to those in children. Some common dyslexia signs and symptoms in teens and adults include:

  • Difficulty reading, including reading aloud
  • Slow and labor-intensive reading and writing
  • Problems spelling
  • Avoiding activities that involve reading
  • Mispronouncing names or words, or problems retrieving words
  • Trouble understanding jokes or expressions that have a meaning not easily understood from the specific words (idioms), such as “piece of cake” meaning “easy”
  • Spending an unusually long time completing tasks that involve reading or writing
  • Difficulty summarizing a story
  • Trouble learning a foreign language
  • Difficulty memorizing
  • Difficulty doing math problems

When to see a doctor

Though most children are ready to learn reading by kindergarten or first grade, children with dyslexia often can’t grasp the basics of reading by that time. Talk with your doctor if your child’s reading level is below what’s expected for his or her age or if you notice other signs of dyslexia.

When dyslexia goes undiagnosed and untreated, childhood reading difficulties continue into adulthood.

Causes

Dyslexia tends to run in families. It appears to be linked to certain genes that affect how the brain processes reading and language, as well as risk factors in the environment.

Risk factors

Dyslexia risk factors include:

  • A family history of dyslexia or other learning disabilities
  • Premature birth or low birth weight
  • Exposure during pregnancy to nicotine, drugs, alcohol or infection that may alter brain development in the fetus
  • Individual differences in the parts of the brain that enable reading

Complications

Dyslexia can lead to a number of problems, including:

  • Trouble learning. Because reading is a skill basic to most other school subjects, a child with dyslexia is at a disadvantage in most classes and may have trouble keeping up with peers.
  • Social problems. Left untreated, dyslexia may lead to low self-esteem, behavior problems, anxiety, aggression, and withdrawal from friends, parents and teachers.
  • Problems as adults. The inability to read and comprehend can prevent a child from reaching his or her potential as the child grows up. This can have long-term educational, social and economic consequences.

Children who have dyslexia are at increased risk of having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and vice versa. ADHD can cause difficulty sustaining attention as well as hyperactivity and impulsive behavior, which can make dyslexia harder to treat.

Treatment

There’s no known way to correct the underlying brain abnormality that causes dyslexia — dyslexia is a lifelong problem. However, early detection and evaluation to determine specific needs and appropriate treatment can improve success.

Educational techniques

Dyslexia is treated using specific educational approaches and techniques, and the sooner the intervention begins, the better. Psychological testing will help your child’s teachers develop a suitable teaching program.

Teachers may use techniques involving hearing, vision and touch to improve reading skills. Helping a child use several senses to learn — for example, listening to a taped lesson and tracing with a finger the shape of the letters used and the words spoken — can help in processing the information.

Treatment focuses on helping your child:

  • Learn to recognize and use the smallest sounds that make up words (phonemes)
  • Understand that letters and strings of letters represent these sounds and words (phonics)
  • Comprehend what he or she is reading
  • Read aloud to build reading accuracy, speed and expression (fluency)
  • Build a vocabulary of recognized and understood words

If available, tutoring sessions with a reading specialist can be helpful for many children with dyslexia. If your child has a severe reading disability, tutoring may need to occur more frequently, and progress may be slower.

Individual education plan

In the United States, schools have a legal obligation to take steps to help children diagnosed with dyslexia with their learning problems. Talk to your child’s teacher about setting up a meeting to create a structured, written plan that outlines your child’s needs and how the school will help him or her succeed. This is called an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

Early treatment

Children with dyslexia who get extra help in kindergarten or first grade often improve their reading skills enough to succeed in grade school and high school.

Children who don’t get help until later grades may have more difficulty learning the skills needed to read well. They’re likely to lag behind academically and may never be able to catch up. A child with severe dyslexia may never have an easy time reading, but he or she can learn skills that improve reading and develop strategies to improve school performance and quality of life.

What parents can do

You play a key role in helping your child succeed. Take these steps:

  • Address the problem early. If you suspect your child has dyslexia, talk to your child’s doctor. Early intervention can improve success.
  • Read aloud to your child. It’s best if you start when your child is 6 months old or even younger. Try listening to recorded books with your child. When your child is old enough, read the stories together after your child hears them.
  • Work with your child’s school. Talk to your child’s teacher about how the school will help him or her succeed. You are your child’s best advocate.
  • Encourage reading time. To improve reading skills, a child must practice reading. Encourage your child to read.
  • Set an example for reading. Designate a time each day to read something of your own while your child reads — this sets an example and supports your child. Show your child that reading can be enjoyable.

What adults with dyslexia can do

Success in employment can be difficult for adults struggling with dyslexia. To help achieve your goals:

  • Seek evaluation and instructional help with reading and writing, regardless of your age
  • Ask about additional training and reasonable accommodations from your employer or academic institution under the Americans with Disabilities Act

The advantages of a low carb diet and health benefits.

A reminder of all the benefits of low carb and how to start. Perfect for this time of year.

To ditch the carbs for good, you need to understand the advantages of a low-carb diet, how to start, what to eat and how to avoid the common mistakes.

The advantages of a low carb diet. Read what is a low carb diet, what you can eat and how to start low carb living. Read all the amazing health benefits from eating low carb. | ditchthecarbs.com

This is a guest post by Michael Joseph who is a passionate nutrition educator with a master’s degree in Nutrition Education. He is the founder of Nutrition Advance where he frequently writes nutrition and health-related articles. He believes that nutrition advice has become overly complicated and that we need to get back to the basics and value our traditional food. Photo credits go to Nutrition Advance.

THE ADVANTAGES OF A LOW-CARB DIET : WHY YOU NEED TO DITCH THE CARBS

The advantages of a low-carb diet. Read what is a low carb diet, what you can eat and how to start low carb living. Read all the amazing health benefits from eating low carb. | ditchthecarbs.com

Low-carb diets have been attracting more media attention as of late. As for the reason, it’s simple: they just work. Added to that, many people still believe that fat clogs arteries, so the diet creates controversy. In truth, fat is essential for your health, carbohydrates are not.

This article will also explain the how to start a low-carb diet, what to eat and there is a sample meal plan at the end. But let’s begin by taking a look at a few of the main advantages of a low carb diet.

1. ADVANTAGES OF A LOW-CARB DIET ON BLOOD SUGAR AND INSULIN LEVELS

Eating carbohydrates has the biggest impact on our blood sugar and insulin levels. Restricting carbohydrates in our diet has a direct result in lowering our sugar levels and insulin needs. High sugar levels play a part in almost all chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, dementia, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

By lowering carbohydrate intake, blood sugars are controlled and insulin levels are minimised. This is incredibly beneficial for those with diabetes (type one or two) and those with insulin resistance.

2. ADVANTAGES OF A LOW-CARB DIET FOR HUNGER

Low-carb diets increase satiety due to the balanced blood sugar levels they promote.

Unlike diets high in carbohydrate, blood sugar and insulin spikes throughout the day are kept to a minimum.

In a comprehensive study analyzing food cravings and appetite, participants on a low-carb diet were directly compared to participants on a  typical low-fat diet. The results showed that the low-carb group suffered much lower cravings and were a lot less bothered by hunger.

Due to the satiety-promoting effects of dietary fat, anyone who has adopted a low-carb diet will know this for themselves. A diet high in healthy fats definitely keeps cravings away.

3. ADVANTAGES OF A LOW-CARB DIET  FOR THE HEART

Low-carb diets have a beneficial impact on a whole host of heart disease risk factors. Specifically, they reduce triglycerides (a major risk factor fro cardiovascular disease) and increase the concentrations of HDL (known as the “good” cholesterol).

Additionally, they lead to reduced blood sugar, insulin, and inflammation in the body; all of these things can be damaging to the heart. As well as this, another big advantage is weight loss, since heavier weights and obesity increase cardiovascular risk.

The advantages of a low-carb diet on cardiovascular risk factors. | ditchthecarbs.com

Here is a study documenting all these positive effects of an LCHF diet.

  • Lower triglycerides
  • Increased HDL levels
  • Lowered glucose and insulin levels
  • Increased weight loss
  • Reduced systemic inflammation

4. ADVANTAGES OF A LOW-CARB DIET FOR WEIGHT LOSS

To investigate the impact of a low-carb diet on weight, Harvard School of Public Health analyzed more than 53 different studies featuring more than 68,000 participants.

The results were not surprising: out of all the weight-loss dietary interventions, the individuals using low-carb interventions lost greater weight than participants on low-fat interventions.

Considering how the personal anecdotes and new studies are piling up by the day, it’s clear to see that the advantages a low-carb diet brings are worth pursuing.

Not only do you get to eat amazingly fresh, delicious foods every day, but you also vastly improve your health and decrease the risk of illness striking in the future.

For me, it’s a no-brainer, and I promise that if you get the hang of a low-carb diet, you won’t even want to go back to your prior way of eating.

Once you have a taste for real food, all the ultra-processed foods taste terrible.

HOW DO I FOLLOW A LOW-CARB DIET?

The advantages of a low-carb diet. Read what is a low carb diet, what you can eat and how to start low carb living. Read all the amazing health benefits from eating low carb. | ditchthecarbs.com

At its most basic, the low carb diet (or LCHF: low-carb high-fat) means eating plenty of healthy animal foods as well as nutrient-dense plant foods. We should encourage and emphasise the most nutritious types of these plant foods.

Look at spinach or an avocado; they are full of nutrients yet extremely low in digestible carbohydrates (which turn to sugar in the body). By the same token, if we examine bread or rice then sure, they do have a few nutrients, but not so many. Added to that, they also contain a significant amount of digestible carbohydrate which raises your blood sugars incredibly.

Looking at the picture above, we can see that the three most nutrient-dense food groups are encouraged.

HOW MANY CARBS SHOULD I EAT ON A LOW-CARB DIET?

If you are just starting a low-carb diet, this can be confusing. In brief, one man’s low-carb diet is another man’s high-carb diet. By that, I just mean that there is no one-size-fits-all amount of carbohydrate you need to eat.

However, to get the best advantages of a low-carb diet, it’s better to aim at the lower end of the scale.

EXTREMELY LOW-CARB DIET PLANS

Typically, diets extremely low in carbohydrate contain 25g per day or less of carbs. This way of eating is otherwise known as a ketogenic diet. For most people, following an extremely low-carb diet is optional rather than necessary.

Some people enjoy the low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) lifestyle just for overall healthier eating and the benefits on body composition. For others, though, keeping the carbohydrate low is a more critical pursuit.

LOW-CARB DIETS AND TYPE 2 DIABETES

Due to what many see as the failure of dietary guidelines to manage the rising tide of type 2 diabetes, many diabetics have been turning to the low-carb diet. This decision makes complete sense. In a healthy person, insulin is released by the body to shuttle excess sugar out of the blood and into our cells. The diagram below illustrates this:

The advantages of a low-carb diet. Read what is a low carb diet, what you can eat and how to start low carb living. Read all the amazing health benefits from eating low carb. | ditchthecarbs.com

To make a complicated story simple; in Type two diabetics, the pancreas is now producing an inadequate amount of insulin which the body’s cells have become resistant to. The result is unchecked, rapidly rising blood sugar levels when eating foods that convert to glucose. Therefore, you could say that these people are intolerant to carbohydrate.

That brings us to the question: why would we feed a plate full of carbohydrate to someone with an intolerance to it? As well as this, protein and fat do not have a significant impact on blood sugar levels. As a result, ditching the carbs takes away the one dietary macronutrient that causes blood sugar spikes in diabetics.

While it’s generally accepted that there’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, a low-carb diet may permanently reverse the disease. And it has for many.

A RELAXED LOW-CARB DIET

A carbohydrate intake of anywhere between 25g and 150g digestible carbs qualifies as a more relaxed low-carb diet. While 150g of carbohydrate is far from a small amount, it’s still a vast improvement to the standard carb-heavy diet most westernized nations follow.

Opting for a carb intake on the higher side of the scale may also be a choice for athletes who feel it helps their performance. However, elite sports performance is still definitely possible on lower amounts of carbs.

All things considered, the true advantages of a low-carb diet quickly become apparent on the lower side of the scale.

As a result of going very low carb, many people experience effortless weight loss, more energy (after the initial adaptation period), and an altogether healthier relationship with food.

Personally, I usually stick to somewhere between 50g and 80g per day. However, more than half of the total tends to come from fibrous plant foods such as avocado, nuts, dark chocolate and leafy greens.

COMMON MISTAKES

The advantages of a low carb diet. Read what is a low carb diet, what you can eat and how to start low carb living. Read all the amazing health benefits from eating low carb. | ditchthecarbs.com

It’s also worth remembering a typical mistake many people make when they ditch the carbs. By this, I’m referring to the error of not replacing the reduced carbs with enough healthy sources of fat. As a result, people quite understandably feel terrible and struggle through the day with a lack of energy combined with food cravings. The result is getting stressed and ultimately giving up on their new diet before giving it a chance.

Hence low carb diets should emphasize larger amounts of fat, but the source of this dietary fat is critical as there are plenty of bad fats out there. A good rule of thumb is to stick to naturally-occurring fats from nature, rather than chemically processed ones created in a factory. As an example, organic grass-fed butter and margarine are poles apart regarding their respective health merits. And hopefully, you know that butter is the healthy one!

Another thing to (not) consider is the GI index of carbohydrate. Regarding this, you should be aware that the glycemic index of foods has no relation to low-carb eating. Although many people associate ‘high GI’ with bad and ‘low GI’ with good, all this means is that the body digests some carbs slower than others. No matter the speed, they are still all digested and contribute to the carbohydrate total.

Select the right amount of carbs for you and don’t be afraid of adding more healthy fat.

WHICH LOW-CARB FOODS ARE HEALTHY?

Generally speaking, low-carb diets should include lots of fresh, single-ingredient foods. However, this isn’t always the case, and it is possible to ‘do’ a low-carb diet wrong.

In short; to experience the advantages of a low carb diet you have to formulate your diet correctly. To sum up, the food choices you make will determine whether your low-carb diet is healthy or unhealthy.

Hence here is an infographic that I created to show an overview of the best foods to include:

The advantages of a low-carb diet. Read what is a low carb diet, what you can eat and how to start low carb living. Read all the amazing health benefits from eating low carb. | ditchthecarbs.com

This graphic provides a good overview of how a low-carb diet should look. Also, let’s take a look at the individual food groups in a bit more detail. Take a look at the next page to see what to eat, what to avoid and a meal plan.

Bulletproof Bread: Keto, Low Carb Bread Recipe – Diet Program

Bake Bulletproof Bread With This Keto, Low Carb Bread Recipe

When I recommend that people give up gluten (which I do regularly) one of the most common responses is “I could never stop eating bread.”

No surprise – bread is delicious, and it was probably a dietary staple for most of us growing up. It’s also fairly toxic. For many people, gluten (and therefore bread) links to gut inflammation, brain fog, weight gain, and autoimmune disease. To top it off, wheat is especially susceptible to mold growth and mycotoxin contamination, which brings with it a whole host of health problems, from hormone disruption to cancer. No wonder so many people are going gluten-free1.

As the gluten-free diet grows in popularity, so does the rise of gluten-free, low carb bread (no pun intended). Often, though, gluten-free breads are no better than the loafs they imitate. They usually have an equally high glycemic load and contain ingredients derived from corn, potatoes, or soy. Not Bulletproof. But what if you could have your bread and eat it, too?

That’s where Bulletproof bread – keto, low carb bread – comes in. It’s pure fat and protein, so it’ll keep you in a fat-burning, energy-producing ketogenic state (you can read up on ketosis here). It’s also a near perfect replacement for normal bread, from texture to taste. Try it with butter, serve a burger on it, make a BLT with it – it’s firm and chewy enough to stand in for bread in pretty much any recipe.

Oh, and did I mention it’s only three ingredients?

Learn how to make it here in this awesome video from Bulletproof Ambassador Veronica Culver. The original recipe suggests whey protein, but baking denatures whey and can cause inflammation. Try using collagen instead. The bread will still turn out beautifully.

Bulletproof Bread Recipe For Keto, Low Carb Bread:

Makes 1 Loaf

Ingredients:

  1. 6 pastured eggs, separated
  2. 1/2 cup grass-fed Bulletproof Collagen Protein
  3. Grass-fed butter (to grease pan)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Use middle rack and remove any racks above as bread will expand while baking.

Generously butter a loaf pan/dish with grass-fed butter. (Side note: If possible, use a ceramic pan. The bread will cook evenly without sticking, and a ceramic pan won’t leach chemicals like Teflon cookware will.)

Beat 6 egg whites until stiff peaks form – a hand mixer on high works well. Really beat the whites until the peaks are VERY stiff. If you don’t beat them enough, they’ll collapse when you add the whey and egg yolks, and you’ll end up with a Styrofoam-like concoction. Yuck.

Add ½ cup of  Bulletproof Collagen Protein and the 6 yolks. Blend gently on low just until fully incorporated. The batter will be fluffy.

Pour batter into prepared dish and place in oven.

Bake for 40 minutes.

Remove and allow to cool completely. The loaf will sink to a normal height.

Once fully cooled, release from dish, slice and serve.

Leftovers will keep in the fridge for a few1 days.

Reheating recommendation: Heat a skillet to medium-high and add ghee or grass-fed butter, sear bread slices in skillet until lightly toasted on each side, about 30 seconds per side. Do not overheat.

Use heat-stable collagen over whey protein, and keep in mind that oxidized cholesterol from the cooked egg yolks can cause a little inflammation, so don’t eat this every day. Stick to every few days, if you can control yourself. 😉

This recipe was adapted from “The Ketogenic Cookbook” by Jimmy Moore and Maria Emmerich.
This video comes to us from Veronica Culver, a Bulletproof Ambassador and Founder of The Enchanted Cook. Many thanks, Veronica!

By Dave Asprey

How to Order Low Carb / Keto at Starbucks and 10 Low Carb Starbucks Copycat Recipes- Weight Loss Program

Being born and raised in Washington State, just outside of Seattle, Starbucks is a staple. It is part of our landscape. It’s  just something we do. I am surprised it is not used as a verb yet – like Facebooking, googling or tweeting. Friend -“Hey, what are you up to tomorrow?” Me – “Oh you know, just Starbucking” You could say that Seattle is the coffee capital of the U.S. The city of Seattle has the greatest concentration of coffee houses in the country. The original Starbucks opened in 1971 in the Pike Place Market and has been iconic to this area ever since. Have you ever tried to visit the original Starbucks during the summer? There is a line through the entire store and down the side walk outside.

Now, it is rare to travel anywhere and not see a Starbucks. People will get up early to grab it before work. They will wait in long lines, pre-order through their app, and even fork over cash they really don’t have for a cup of that delicious bean juice.

So the big question on every low carbers mind is “Do I have to give up my daily Starbucks to maintain my low carb, ketogenic lifestyle?” The answer is NO!! You just have to get creative with your ordering. Don’t be too shy to ask for exactly what you want. You are handing over your hard earned money and paying a premium to go to Starbucks, versus other coffee chains. You should get exactly what you want, even if it is an off-menu or custom made drink. Never once have I been met with anything but friendliness when requesting a special order. They may not always get it right, but they will certainly try and are always willing to remake it. I am here to help you get creative with your low carb ordering. Starbucks is back on your low carb menu!! So, what can you order? Here are several to get your started. I will add more options as I think of them.

The obvious choices:
  • Espresso – There are no carbs in a shot of espresso. It is definitely an acquired taste, but it is always a viable option.
  • Drip Coffee – You can drink it black or you can add cream and sugar free syrup to it. This is how I drink my coffee at home on most days. When I am not drinking Bulletproof coffee that is.
  • Iced Coffee – Again, you can add any sugar free syrups you want to this. You can also add heavy cream or half and half
  • Cold Brew – This is made in house daily and in small batches. Get it early before they are sold out.
  • Hot Tea – Starbucks has a lot of great hot tea flavors. Drink it as is or add a little sweetener or sugar free syrup to it.
  • Cappucino – Cappuccino is just espresso and milk foam. If you like it wetter, it also has a little steamed milk in it. You can have it plain or you can add sugar free syrup to it. There is something so comforting about a foamy cappuccino.
Here are some options to replace your daily latte:
  • Order an americano (iced or hot) with a splash of heavy cream. Starbucks makes their own whipped cream, therefore they all carry heavy cream. If you want it flavored, just add any of their sugar free syrups.
  • Order a latte, sub half and half (breve) or heavy cream. If you want it flavored, just add any of their sugar free syrups. This will be very creamy. If you don’t want it so rich, order the americano option above instead.
  • Order a latte, but ask for almond milk or coconut milk as a substitution. Many Starbucks now carry both. Note – They are not unsweetened and do have some sugar and carbs. They are still much lower than milk. Ask to see the container. They will happily show you. Then you can see for sure if they are right for your personal carb allowance.
Here are some options to replace your daily frappucino:
  • This one took them a couple of tries to get right. They looked at me like I was nuts, but once they got it right, it became my favorite summer drink. Ask for a Coffee Light Frappucino with half water and half heavy cream instead of the nonfat milk. It has a subtle sweetness all on its own, but you can add any of their sugar free syrups for a little more flavor
  • Ask for a Sugar Free Cinnamon Dulce Light Frappucino with half water and half heavy cream instead of non-fat milk. Trust me when I tell you that your low carb blended coffee drink game just got elevated.
    Here are some options to replace your daily mocha:
    • Order a Skinny Mocha with half heavy cream and half water. Alternately you can ask to sub half and half (breve)
    • Order an Americano with skinny mocha sauce and a splash of heavy cream
    • Order a coconut or almond milk mocha, sub skinny mocha sauce
    • Order a sugar free peppermint mocha with skinny mocha sauce with half heavy cream and half water. Alternately, you can ask to sub half and half (breve)
    • Not a coffee drinker? Order a skinny mocha hot chocolate breve
      Save carbs and money and make your own:

      If you are looking to save some cash and probably even a few carbs, you can try out these low carb, keto Starbucks copycat recipes. If you have ever been in line and found yourself drooling over the pastry case, have no fear, I have included some copycat recipes for some of Starbucks most popular sweet treats as well.

      Low Carb Starbucks Copycat Caramel Frappucino
      Low Carb Starbucks Copycat Caramel Frappucino – All Day I Dream About Food

      Low Carb Copycat Starbucks Cool Lime Refresher
      Low Carb Copy Cat Cool Lime Refresher – Sugar Free Mom

      Low Carb Starbucks Copycat Pumpkin Spice Latte
      Low Carb Starbucks Copycat Pumpkin Spice Latte – Low Carb So Simple

      Low Carb Copycat Pumpkin Spice Frappucino
      Low Carb Pumpkin Spice Spice Frappucino

      iced-vanilla-matcha-grean-tea-latte-feat
      Iced Vanilla Green Tea Matcha Latte – Low Carb Yum

      Low Carb Starbucks Pink Drink Copycat
      Low Carb Starbucks Pink Drink Copycat Recipe – KetoDiet Blog

      Starbucks Lemon Loaf Low Carb Copycat Recipe
      Starbucks Lemon Loaf – Maria Mind Body Health

      Low Carb Starbucks Copycat Mini Vanilla Bean Scones
      Mini Vanilla Bean Scones – All Day I Dream About Food

      Low Carb Starbucks Copycat Salted Caramel Cake Pops

      Low Carb Starbucks Copycat Salted Caramel Cake Pops – All Day I Dream About Food