120 Zero Carb foods+Atkins+Induction and Ketosis+Food log tips+Printable list 4 day No Carb Meal Plan

Almost Zero Carb Food List

Seize the Way |

Imagine a zero carb world where nervous carb counting doesn’t exist.

If you’re starting low carb, speeding up ketosis or in Atkins Induction, no carb foods will set you free.

  • Tips for going zero carb
  • How to read no carb food labels
  • Real life zero carb food experience and 6 week food log
  • Printable list of no carb foods
  • Almost zero carb meal plan

The list of low carb foods is HUGE. Zero carb foods are more limited, especially in the fruit and veggie area. But there are still over 100 choices for richly satisfying meals.

 

no carb food list mushroom cap

Finding foods with zero carbs isn’t hard (anymore.)

Use our zero carb and (almost) zero carb food lists, read package labels carefully and be pleasantly surprised at all the options.

 

Using the No Carb Foods List

Technically speaking, fats are the only foods that are completely zero carb. Even meats and seafood have trace amounts.

What You Must Know:

The foods on this list have very minor amounts of net carbs – fractions of a gram. These foods are so close to zero, most low carbers consider them ‘no carb foods.’

The “almost” zero carb foods are a bit higher, but a single serving from the list is still under 1 net carb.

One Warning:

Track your servings. Trace amounts of carbs still add up.

 

Tips for Going Zero Carb

You’ve decided to go low – really low. These three easy tips simplify starting your zero carb diet.

 

Give yourself a few days to prepare.

Check your fridge and cabinets, move any higher carb foods to the side, and fill the space with your favorite no carb foods.

Plan a zero carb grocery trip and stock up!

 

Focus on what you ARE allowed to eat.

Zero carb foods are savory and delicious. You won’t feel like you’re depriving yourself.

 

Have fun. Try new things.

If you are eating foods with no carbs, you are cooking more often. Having some fun with your food is a good way to build positive associations.

 

Real Life Zero Carb Food Log

What’s it really like to go zero carb? Rebecca Latham of Low Carb Better Health went zero carb, keeping food logs for six weeks:

Rebecca-zero-carb-foods    I am eating meat, a small amount of dairy, some healthy fats and I am drinking water only.

I have also been eating Fat Bombs, which contain almond butter, cocoa power and Stevia.

I am carefully tracking what I am eating. Here is what I have learned so far about how my blood sugar reacts to food.

 

No Carb Food Labels

Many food labels list foods as having zero carbs. Labeling laws allow food companies to print “zero grams” on the label if the food has less than one gram of carbs.

Sugar substitutes, cheeses, eggs and spices are common examples of this situation. If you’re being extra cautious, count them as .5 net carbs per serving.

 

List of Foods with No Carbs

There are zero carb foods in almost every food group, so it’s easy to enjoy a variety of foods when going no carb.

Select the image to view, print or save. Opens in a new window.

printable list of foods with no carbs

 

Zero Carb Meat

High in protein and vitamins, most natural meats have zero carbs.

Packaged, cured and processed meats (sausage, hot dogs, deli meat, bacon, etc.) have some carbs due to added flavoring, preservatives or starchy binders.

Be sure to check the labels.

These natural meats have no carbs:

  • Beef
  • Veal
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Fowl (turkey, chicken, duck, goose, hen, quail)
  • Organ Meats (brains, tongue, liver, heart, kidneys)
  • Game Meats (venison, bison, ostrich, caribou, elk)
  • Exotic Meats (such as ostrich and emu)

 

Zero Carb Bacon Bars

bbacon meat bar keto snack

Zero carb, game-changing Epic Bacon Bars let you “Enter bacon bliss… Indulge in bacon lust freely and frequently.” (100% natural)

 

Zero Carb Seafood

Fresh (unprocessed) seafood is zero carb:

  • Cod
  • Flounder
  • Sole
  • Haddock
  • Halibut
  • Sardine
  • Swordfish
  • Tuna
  • Trout
  • Salmon
  • Catfish
  • Bass

These options have trace carbs:

  • Crab
  • Shrimp
  • Lobster
  • Squid

These options have a bit more:

  • Oysters (count .35 net carbs per oyster)
  • Mussels (count .38 net carbs per mussel)
  • Clams (count .35 net carbs per clam)

 

Zero Carb Seasoning

Flavoring zero carb foods makes them much more palatable.

  • Salt and Pepper
  • Vinegar
  • Ground Cinnamon
  • Most Hot Sauces
  • Pre-mixed Seasonings (check the label)
  • Yellow Mustard
  • Dill weed
  • Chives, Basil, Oregano, Rosemary, Thyme, etc.

 

Zero Carb Oils and Fats

The following fats and oils have zero carbs:

  • Olive oil
  • Coconut oil
  • Grass-fed butter
  • Walnut Oil
  • MCT oil
  • Avocado oil
  • Fish oil
  • Animal Fats (including lard)

Less healthy oils:

  • Mayonnaise (check each label)
  • Vegetable Shortening
  • Sesame oil

 

Organic Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is high in Medium Chain Triglycerides, or (MCT) fatty acids. These fats are metabolized differently.

Coconut oil is used immediately for energy – not stored.

Organic Coconut Oil

Carrington farms organic coconut oil is gluten free, non-GMO, free of hydrogenated and trans fats, Kosher and zero carb.

 

High Performance MCT Oil

bulletproof coffee best MCT Oil

 

Left Coast’s pure MCT oil blend is easier to absorb and digest.

MCT converts into energy faster than other oils, ignites your body’s metabolic rate and helps maintain healthy levels of cholesterol.

 

Zero Carb Binders

Unflavored, powdered gelatin is a high protein, zero carb food. Gelatin strengthens hair and nails, helps skin stay elastic and helps with sleep.

Low carb guru, Dana Carpender has excellent ideas for adding gelatin:

Dana Carpender zero carb foods    “I intend to start adding gelatin to things, too. In particular, I plan to mix gelatin into ground meat dishes, from burgers to meat loaves to chili.

Why not? It’s flavorless. I’m betting in the burgers and meat loaves it holds moisture, and acts as a binder.

I’ve also started adding pork rind crumbs to a lot of ground meat recipes, not only for flavor, but for the gelatin.”

– from Hold The Toast “Gelatin Blowing My Mind”)

Use zero carb gelatin as a binder for ground meat, or add to lemonade for a filling, protein boost.

 

Zero Carb Beverages

These beverages are zero carb:

  • Water
  • Sparkling Water
  • Club Soda
  • Coffee
  • Tea
  • Diet Soda (watch the artificial sweetener)

 

Zero Carb Sweeteners

Companies advertise aspartame, sucralose, saccharine and stevia as no carb sugar substitutes. However – the powder and granular ones usually contain trace amounts of carbohydrate fillers.

It only takes a little to go a long way. Use a sprinkle.

Note: Artificial sweeteners can affect insulin the same way sugar does, so watch your progress, use sparingly and with caution.

 

Liquid De-Bittered Stevia

EZ-Sweetz’s de-bittered stevia blend has no unpleasant aftertaste. This blend has none of the characteristic bitterness of typical stevia sweeteners.

EZ-Sweetz Liquid De-Bittered Stevia

 

Zero Carb Alcohol

Use alcohol with caution. Your body burns alcohol before it burns fat for fuel. When you have metabolized all the alcohol, your body will return to burning fat.

Alcohol knocks some low carbers out of ketosis for several days after drinking alcohol. Everyone is different, so watch your progress and adjust if necessary.

  • Gin
  • Rum (unflavored)
  • Vodka (unflavored)
  • Whiskey
  • Tequila
  • Scotch

 

zero carb food greens cheese seeds

(Almost) Zero Carb Foods

This list of almost zero carb foods really expands your options without compromising your plan.

A single serving of these foods contains less than 1 net carb. Measure carefully and spread your extra carbs throughout the day.

 

Almost Zero Fruits and Veggies

Many of the leafy green vegetables (spinach, lettuce, celery, kale, turnip greens) are great choices for going zero carb.

Although commonly thought of as vegetables, avocados are fruit, almost zero carb and a source of healthy fat.

Raspberries are high in fiber and are great to sprinkle over a salad or top with whipped cream.

 

Serving size: 1/2 cup

  • Spinach .2
  • Parsley .4
  • Avocado .5
  • Radish .5
  • Lettuce .25
  • Bok Choy .7
  • Celery .8

Serving size: 1/4 cup

  • Mushrooms .5
  • Garlic (1/2 clove) .5
  • Pokeberry Shoots .5
  • Cabbage .5
  • Asparagus (3 pieces) .6
  • Coconut .5
  • Yellow Squash .7
  • Raspberries .7
  • Cauliflower .7
  • Broccoli .8
  • Cucumber .9

 

Almost Zero Eggs and Dairy

Eggs

Eggs are so versatile: fried, scrambled, omelets, quiche, boiled, deviled and of course – egg salad.

  • Eggs  .2 to .7 per egg (check the carton)

Eggs are almost zero carb, ranging from .2 to 1 net carb per egg. Organic, free-range, cage-free, etc. eggs have larger yolks, making them lower in carbs. Be sure to check each carton.

 

Heavy Cream

Most heavy whipping cream brands have less than 1 carb per tablespoon, even if the packaging declares “0 carbs.”

Check labels carefully – each brand of cream is very different.

  • Heavy Cream  .4 net carbs per tablespoon.
  • Half-and-Half  .2 to 1 net carb per tablespoon.

 

Almost Zero Cheese

Most natural, unprocessed cheeses (no added flavors or ingredients) are 0 to 1 net carb per serving. Hard cheeses will be the lowest; softer, creamy cheeses will be the highest.

The following cheeses and net carb amounts are from FatSecret, Popular Cheeses. When in doubt, check each label.

 

Serving size: 1 oz = 1″ cube = 1/4 cup grated (approx.)

  • Asiago .9
  • Blue .6
  • Brie .1
  • Camembert .1
  • Cheddar .3
  • Colby .7
  • Edam .4
  • Fontina .4
  • Goats .6
  • Gouda .6
  • Gruyère .1
  • Havarti .7
  • Mexican Blend Cheese .5
  • Monterey .1
  • Mozzarella .6
  • Muenster .3
  • Neufchatel .1 to .8
  • Parmesan .9
  • Provolone .6
  • Ricotta .8

* This list goes on and on… Be adventurous and try something new!

 

Almost Zero Carb Meal Plan

The Almost Zero meal plan is three easy days, one aggressive technique and major fat loss.

inside almost zero carb meal plan

The plan is designed to break even the worst stall, and burn off large amounts of stored fat – in 3 days.

  • The Technique
  • 150 Recipes (100 under 1 net carb)
  • Sample Menus, Shopping List
  • Printable Planner

If what you’re doing isn’t working, get your meal plan now.

 

Almost Zero Carb Food List

 

Source

Social and Emotional Problems Related to Dyslexia

By: Michael Ryan, M.D. and International Dyslexia Association

About the author

Dr. Michael Ryan is a psychologist with a private practice in Grand Rapids, MI. He specializes in working with people with learning disabilities. A dyslexic himself, Dr. Ryan is a past president of the Michigan Branch of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) and a former national vice president of IDA.

Do emotional disorders cause dyslexia?

Research indicates that dyslexia is caused by biological factors not emotional or family problems. Samuel T. Orton, M.D. was one of the first researchers to describe the emotional aspects of dyslexia. According to his research, the majority of dyslexic preschoolers are happy and well adjusted. Their emotional problems begin to develop when early reading instruction does not match their learning style. Over the years, the frustration mounts as classmates surpass the dyslexic student in reading skills. Recent research funded by the National Institute of Health has identified many of the neurological and cognitive differences that contribute to dyslexia. The vast majority of these factors appear to be caused by genetics rather than poor parenting or childhood depression or anxiety.

Why is dyslexia discouraging and frustrating?

The frustration of children with dyslexia often centers on their inability to meet expectations. Their parents and teachers see a bright, enthusiastic child who is not learning to read and write. Time and again, dyslexics and their parents hear, “He’s such a bright child; if only he would try harder.” Ironically, no one knows exactly how hard the dyslexic is trying.

The pain of failing to meet other people’s expectations is surpassed only by dyslexics’ inability to achieve their goals. This is particularly true of those who develop perfectionistic expectations in order to deal with their anxiety. They grow up believing that it is “terrible” to make a mistake.

However, their learning disability, almost by definition means that these children will make many “careless” or “stupid” mistakes. This is extremely frustrating to them, as it makes them feel chronically inadequate.

The dyslexic frequently has problems with social relationships. These can be traced to causes:

  • Dyslexic children may be physically and socially immature in comparison to their peers. This can lead to a poor self-image and less peer acceptance.
  • Dyslexics’ social immaturity may make them awkward in social situations.
  • Many dyslexics have difficulty reading social cues. They may be oblivious to the amount of personal distance necessary in social interactions or insensitive to other people’s body language.
  • Dyslexia often affects oral language functioning. Affected persons may have trouble finding the right words, may stammer, or may pause before answering direct questions. This puts them at a disadvantage as they enter adolescence, when language becomes more central to their relationships with peers.

My clinical observations lead me to believe that, just as dyslexics have difficulty remembering the sequence of letters or words, they may also have difficulty remembering the order of events. For example, let us look at a normal playground interaction between two children. A dyslexic child takes a toy that belongs to another child, who calls the dyslexic a name. The dyslexic then hits the other child. In relating the experience, the dyslexic child may reverse the sequence of events. He may remember that the other child called him a name, and he then took the toy and hit the other child.

This presents two major difficulties for the dyslexic child. First, it takes him longer to learn from his mistakes. Second, if an adult witnessed the events, and asks the dyslexic child what happened, the child seems to be lying.

Unfortunately, most interactions between children involve not three events, but 15 to 20. With his sequencing and memory problems, the dyslexic may relate a different sequence of events each time he tells the tale. Teachers, parents, and psychologists conclude that he is either psychotic or a pathological liar.

The inconsistencies of dyslexia produce serious challenges in a child’s life. There is a tremendous variability in the student’s individual abilities. Although everyone has strengths and weaknesses, the dyslexic’s are greatly exaggerated. Furthermore, the dyslexic’s strengths and weaknesses may be closely related.

I once worked with a young adult who received a perfect score on the Graduate Record Exam in mathematics. He could do anything with numbers except remember them. The graduate students he tutored in advanced statistics or calculus had great difficulty believing that he could not remember their telephone numbers.

These great variations produce a “roller coaster” effect for dyslexics. At times, they can accomplish tasks far beyond the abilities of their peers. At the next moment, they can be confronted with a task that they cannot accomplish. Many dyslexics call this “walking into black holes.” To deal with these kinds of problems, dyslexics need a thorough understanding of their learning disability. This will help them predict both success and failure. Dyslexics also perform erratically within tasks. That is, their errors are inconsistent. For example, I once asked a dyslexic adult to write a hundred word essay on television violence. As one might expect he misspelled the word “television” five times. However, he misspelled it a different way each time. This type of variation makes remediation more difficult.

Finally, dyslexics’ performance varies from day to day. On some days, reading may come fairly easily. However, another day, they may be barely able to write their own name. This inconsistency is extremely confusing not only to the dyslexic, but also to others in his environment.

Few other handicapping conditions are intermittent in nature. A child in a wheelchair remains there; in fact, if on some days the child can walk, most professionals would consider it a hysterical condition. However, for the dyslexic, performance fluctuates. This makes it extremely difficult for the individual to learn to compensate, because he or she cannot predict the intensity of the symptoms on a given day.

What does the dyslexic person feel?

Anxiety

Anxiety is the most frequent emotional symptom reported by dyslexic adults. Dyslexics become fearful because of their constant frustration and confusion in school. These feelings are exacerbated by the inconsistencies of dyslexia. Because they may anticipate failure, entering new situations can becomes extremely anxiety provoking.

Anxiety causes human beings to avoid whatever frightens them. The dyslexic is no exception. However, many teachers and parents misinterpret this avoidance behavior as laziness. In fact, the dyslexic’s hesitancy to participate in school activities such as homework is related more to anxiety and confusion than to apathy.

Anger

Many of the emotional problems caused by dyslexia occur out of frustration with school or social situations. Social scientists have frequently observed that frustration produces anger. This can be clearly seen in many dyslexics.

The obvious target of the dyslexic’s anger would be schools and teachers. However, it is also common for the dyslexic to vent his anger on his parents. Mothers are particularly likely to feel the dyslexic’s wrath. Often, the child sits on his anger during school to the point of being extremely passive. However, once he is in the safe environment of home, these very powerful feelings erupt and are often directed toward the mother. Ironically, it is the child’s trust of the mother that allows him to vent his anger. However, this becomes very frustrating and confusing to the parent who is desperately trying to help their child.

As youngsters reach adolescence, society expects them to become independent. The tension between the expectation of independence and the child’s learned dependence causes great internal conflicts. The adolescent dyslexic uses his anger to break away from those people on which he feels so dependent.

Because of these factors, it may be difficult for parents to help their teenage dyslexic. Instead, peer tutoring or a concerned young adult may be better able to intervene and help the child.

Self image

The dyslexic’s self–image appears to be extremely vulnerable to frustration and anxiety. According to Erik Erikson, during the first years of school, every child must resolve the conflicts between a positive self–image and feelings of inferiority. If children succeed in school, they will develop positive feelings about themselves and believe that they can succeed in life.

If children meet failure and frustration, they learn that they are inferior to others, and that their effort makes very little difference. Instead of feeling powerful and productive, they learn that their environment controls them. They feel powerless and incompetent.

Researchers have learned that when typical learners succeed, they credit their own efforts for their success. When they fail, they tell themselves to try harder. However, when the dyslexic succeeds, he is likely to attribute his success to luck. When he fails, he simply sees himself as stupid.

Research also suggests that these feelings of inferiority develop by the age of ten. After this age, it becomes extremely difficult to help the child develop a positive self–image. This is a powerful argument for early intervention.

Depression

Depression is also a frequent complication in dyslexia. Although most dyslexics are not depressed, children with this kind of learning disability are at higher risk for intense feelings of sorrow and pain. Perhaps because of their low self–esteem, dyslexics are afraid to turn their anger toward their environment and instead turn it toward themselves.

However, depressed children and adolescents often have different symptoms than do depressed adults. The depressed child is unlikely to be lethargic or to talk about feeling sad. Instead he or she may become more active or misbehave to cover up the painful feelings. In the case of masked depression, the child may not seem obviously unhappy. However, both children and adults who are depressed tend to have three similar characteristics:

  • First, they tend to have negative thoughts about themselves, i.e. a negative self–image.
  • Second, they tend to view the world negatively. They are less likely to enjoy the positive experiences in life. This makes it difficult for them to have fun.
  • Finally, most depressed youngsters have great trouble imagining anything positive about the future. The depressed dyslexic not only experiences great pain in his present experiences, but also foresees a life of continuing failure.

Family problems

Like any handicapping condition, dyslexia has a tremendous impact on the child’s family. However, because dyslexia is an invisible handicap, these effects are often overlooked.

Dyslexia affects the family in a variety of ways. One of the most obvious is sibling rivalry. Non–dyslexic children often feel jealous of the dyslexic child, who gets the majority of the parents’ attention, time, and money. Ironically, the dyslexic child does not want this attention. This increases the chances that he or she will act negatively against the achieving children in the family.

Specific developmental dyslexia runs in families. This means that one or both of the child’s parents may have had similar school problems. When faced with a child who is having school problems, dyslexic parents may react in one of two ways. They may deny the existence of dyslexia and believe if the child would just buckle down, he or she could succeed. Or, the parents may relive their failures and frustrations through their child’s school experience. This brings back powerful and terrifying emotions, which can interfere with the adult’s parenting skills.

How can parents and teachers help?

During the past 25 years, I have interviewed many dyslexic adults. Some have learned to deal successfully with their learning problems, while others have not. My experiences suggest that in addition to factors such as intelligence and socio–economic status, other things affect the dyslexic’s chances for success.

First, early in the child’s life, someone has been extremely supportive and encouraging. Second, the young dyslexic found an area in which he or she could succeed. Finally, successful dyslexics appear to have developed a commitment to helping others.

Both teachers and parents need to offer consistent, ongoing encouragement and support. However, one rarely hears about this very important way to help youngsters.

I believe encouragement involves at least four elements. First, listening to children’s feelings. Anxiety, anger and depression are daily companions for dyslexics. However, their language problems often make it difficult for them to express their feelings. Therefore, adults must help them learn to talk about their feelings.

Teachers and parents must reward effort, not just “the product”. For the dyslexic, grades should be less important than progress.

When confronting unacceptable behavior, adults must not inadvertently discourage the dyslexic child. Words such as “lazy” or “incorrigible” can seriously damage the child’s self–image.

Finally, it is important to help students set realistic goals for themselves. Most dyslexic students set perfectionistic and unattainable goals. By helping the child set an attainable goal, teachers can change the cycle of failure.

Even more important, the child needs to recognize and rejoice in his or her successes. To do so, he or she needs to achieve success in some area of life. In some cases, the dyslexic’s strengths are obvious, and many dyslexics’ self–esteem has been salvaged by prowess in athletics, art, or mechanics. However, the dyslexic’s strengths are often more subtle and less obvious. Parents and teachers need to find ways to relate the child’s interests to the demands of real life.

Finally, many successful dyslexic adults deal with their own pain by reaching out to others. They may do volunteer work for charities or churches, or choose vocations that require empathy and a social conscience. These experiences help dyslexics feel more positive about themselves and deal more effectively with their pain and frustration.

Many opportunities exist in our schools, homes and churches for dyslexics to help others. One important area is peer tutoring. If dyslexic students do well in math or science, they can be asked to tutor a classmate who is struggling.

Perhaps that student can reciprocate as a reader for the dyslexic student. Tutoring younger children, especially other dyslexics, can be a positive experience for everyone involved.

Helping dyslexics feel better about themselves and deal effectively with their feelings is a complex task.

First, caring adults must understand the cognitive and affective problems caused by dyslexia. Then they must design strategies that will help the dyslexic, like every other child, to find joy and success in academics and personal relationships.

One Minute Ketogenic Cheesecake

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 2 Tbsp heavy cream
  • 1 egg
  • ½ tsp lemon juice
  • ¼ tsp vanilla
  • 2-4 Tbsp sugar substitute such as powdered erythritol or stevia (mix two or more for a better flavor)

Combine all ingredients in a 1.5 cup microwave-safe bowl, and whisk until smooth. Place in microwave and cook on high for 90 seconds, stirring every 30 seconds to remix ingredients. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Excellent topped with fresh fruit and whipped cream, or a homemade low carb chocolate sauce. (Count extra carbs if additions are made).

Nutrition info per one-cup serving. Calories: 300, Fat: 27.6 grams, Carbohydrates: 2.5 grams, Fiber: 0 grams, Net Carbohydrates: 2.5 grams, Protein: 11 grams.

سونے کی قیمتوں میں کمی

 

سونے کی قیمتوں میں بالترتیب 250 اور214 روپے کی کمی ہو گئی۔ کراچی

بین الاقوامی بلین مارکیٹ میں فی اونس سونے کی قیمت 14 ڈالر کی کمی سے1275کی سطح پر پہنچنے کے باعث مقامی صرافہ مارکیٹوں میں بھی منگل کو فی تولہ اور فی دس گرام سونے کی قیمتوں میں بالترتیب 250 اور214 روپے کی کمی واقع ہوئی۔

سونے کی قیمتوں میں کمی کے نتیجے میں کراچی حیدرآباد سکھر ملتان فیصل آباد لاہور اسلام آباد راولپنڈی پشاور اور کوئٹہ کی صرافہ مارکیٹوں میں فی تولہ سونے کی قیمت گھٹ کر 50 ہزار 750اور فی دس گرام سونے کی قیمت گھٹ کر43 ہزار 500 روپے ہو گئی تاہم فی تولہ چاندی کی قیمت بغیرکسی تبدیلی کے730 روپے اور فی دس گرام چاندی کی قیمت625.71 روپے پرمستحکم رہی ہے۔

فی تولہ سونے کی قیمت گھٹ کر 50 ہزار 750اور فی دس گرام سونے کی قیمت گھٹ کر43 ہزار 500 روپے ہو گئی۔ فوٹو؛ فائل
فی تولہ سونے کی قیمت گھٹ کر 50 ہزار 750اور فی دس گرام سونے کی قیمت گھٹ کر43 ہزار 500 روپے ہو گئی۔ فوٹو؛ فائل

22 THINGS TO AVOID IF YOU HAVE CHIARI MALFORMATION

1. Wear highly cushioned, support shoes to reduce neck, cerebellum pounding. Commercial cross-trainer sneakers are recommended – New Balance, Nike, Reebok etc.- test before buying.

2. Avoid neck-stressing activities (football, soccer, basketball, wave pools, diving, tennis, roller coasters, other amusement park rides of high G forces, lifting in excess of 15 lb, backpacking, falling asleep in chairs, extended reading with head bent etc.)

3. Get plenty of rest and sleep (eight hr minimum). Pillows and sleep position are very important. Soft, small pillows with fiberfill are very good for this i.e. little or no”push” back. (see expanded list below for other comments about pillows). Most Chiarians are side-sensitive. Use a large pillow(s) etc. to prevent rollover onto affected side. Elevate your bed at the head 4-6 inches by inserting old telephone books, bricks, boards or blocks under the front frame legs.  Have a strong relative or friend assist you.  If possible, do the same when staying at a hotel/motel or at the home of relatives.”  Stop eating and drinking three to four hours before bedtime to reduce the need to get up at night.

4. Avoid caffeine, alcohol, aspirin and/or high salt diet if tinnitus is a major symptom or any of these dietary items increase other symptoms.

5. Stay in excellent physical condition via walking, exercise bikes and other non-neck stressing activities – STAY LEAN

6. Sit in soft recliners with high backs and foot rests.

7. Support reading material with elbows on your knees/thighs or chair arms. Read “straight” ahead. Use book holders or music stands. Look at computer monitors straight ahead.

8. Drive if you have to but use wide vision mirrors and get seats with high backs. -Take your time and limit your driving to short distances at slow speed preferably during the day. Some Chiarians find orthopedic collars help reduce neck stress when riding in a car etc. Some do not.

9. Relax and avoid stress and noise. Don’t tighten the neck muscles. Stay “cool”.

10. Put soft cold compresses on the neck/ brain joint area or on the top of your head for about an hour while lying down (these are soft compresses). Some Chiarians prefer warm compresses.

11. Straining during bowel movements should be avoided. Eat plenty of roughage and eat at regular times. Drinking herbal tea containing senna may help give pain-free relief from constipation.

12. Heavy jewelry, scarves, ties, tight collars, bras, rings, bracelets and watches might feel uncomfortable. Adopt a casual life style and don’t wear them.

13. Try to avoid waiting in lines where stutter stepping is involved. Uneven surfaces or checkered designs in floors maybe difficult to walk on. Focusing on an object in front of your or closing one eye may help when dizziness hits.

14. Do crossword puzzles to assist short- term memory retention. Ditto for playing cards.

15. Take calcium supplements to assist in bone enhancement especially after surgery. Be very cautious using vitamins and supplements- most have not been thoroughly tested for primary and side effects. As always, check with your doctor first.

16. TENS machines may help ACM/SM patients, especially those with spasticity (cervical, thoracic, lumbar muscles) and spinal pain. TENS units also can help with headaches. You can buy one for use at home. As always, check with your doctor first.

17. Avoid cervical traction.

18. Lumbar punctures, spinal taps or epidurals can be dangerous for Chiarians. Always ask your doctor and insist they review the literature on these procedures with respect to increasing herniation.

19. Brushing teeth or gargling can result in sneezing. Minimize head motion during brushing and not bending the neck when gargling.

20. Avoid chiropractor adjustment. Most chiropractors have no experience in treating ACM’s. One member’s herniation significantly increased after cervical adjustment. “That is because the herniated went from 3-4 mm to 15-20 mm in 8 months with this treatment (documented on MRIs)”.

21. Review daily movements to include cooking and cleaning. Eliminate as much neck stress as possible.

22. Use the special tray that most beauty shops have for washing hair for people who cannot lean back on blunt sink rims. Chiarians should never lean back on the edges of sinks.

ADHD in Adults

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ADHD Symptom Snapshot

There are 3 core symptoms of ADHD: inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. The following are examples of how ADHD symptoms may appear in adults.

Only a doctor or other health care professional can diagnose ADHD.

ONLY A DOCTOR OR OTHER HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL CAN DIAGNOSE ADHD

Symptoms of Inattention

  • Often makes careless mistakes and lacks attention to details
    (Examples: overlooking or missing details or handing in work that is inaccurate)
  • Often has difficulty paying attention to tasks
    (Example: difficulty remaining focused during lectures, conversations, or lengthy readings)
  • Often seems to not listen when spoken to directly
    (Example: mind seems elsewhere, even in the absence of obvious distraction)
  • Often fails to follow through on instructions, chores, or duties in the workplace
    (Example: starts tasks but quickly loses focus and is easily sidetracked)
  • Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
    (Examples: messy, disorganized work; poor time management; fails to meet deadlines)
  • Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to participate in tasks requiring sustained mental effort, like preparing reports, completing forms, or reviewing lengthy papers 
  • Often loses things like tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, and mobile phones
  • Often easily distracted by other things, including unrelated thoughts
  • Often forgetful in daily activities, such as running errands, returning calls, paying bills, and keeping appointments

Symptoms of Hyperactivity and Impulsivity

  • Often fidgets with or taps hands and feet or squirms in seat
  • Often leaves seat when remaining seated is expected
    (Example: leaves their place in the office or other workplace setting or in other situations that require remaining seated)
  • Often runs or climbs where it is inappropriate or feels restless (in adults, may be limited to feeling restless)
  • Often unable to participate in leisure activities quietly
  • Often acts as if “on the go” or “driven by a motor”
    (Example: is unable to be or uncomfortable being still for an extended time, as in meetings or restaurants)
  • Often talks excessively
  • Often blurts out an answer before a question has been fully asked
    (Examples: completes people’s sentences; cannot wait for next turn in conversation)
  • Often has difficulty waiting his or her turn, for example, while waiting in line
  • Often interrupts or intrudes on others
    (Examples: butts into conversations, games, or activities; may start using other people’s things without asking or receiving permission; may intrude into or take over what others are doing)

What Living With Idiopathic Hypersomnia Is Really Like

Sleep is my drug; I can’t live without it, I can’t get enough of it, and I crave it every second of every day. To the average person, I might just sound like your typical sleep-deprived college student surviving off of very little shut-eye and numerous shots of espresso. How can sleeping too much be a medical issue? Many times I have been reminded how “blessed” I am that I have no problems falling asleep or staying asleep. Sure, I’m not saying I don’t enjoy dozing off moments after my head hits the pillow, but sometimes I want to be able to fully experience the world beyond the dreams that conspire in my mind. How can I live when all my brain and my body want is to sleep?

It’s called Idiopathic Hypersomnia. I’m guessing you haven’t heard of it, and I don’t blame you for not knowing about such a rare disorder. Everyone seems to know what insomnia is, so when asked what my disorder means, I usually refer to it as the opposite of insomnia; instead of sleeping too little, I sleep too much. Idiopathic Hypersomnia (IH) is commonly defined as excessive daytime sleepiness. My brain is constantly telling me to sleep, but even after hours and hours of resting, I often feel more tired than I did before. On rare occasions, I will feel completely awake, and it is the most amazing feeling ever, something that the average person might take for granted.

Even though my symptoms were not fully apparent until my teenage years, I have always been a tired person. When I was a baby, my mom couldn’t even breastfeed me because I would fall asleep before she got the chance. Once I got older, my tiredness was easily mistaken for laziness, which is ironic because people with IH are the least lazy people that I know. We want so desperately to be able to do what everyone else does, but often times, we just physically and mentally are not capable of keeping up with the busy day-to-day life. I did not find out that I had IH until I had a sleep study done the middle of my senior year of high school. Before that time, my family, friends, and teachers didn’t understand why I would cancel plans, turn in homework late, or sleep all afternoon and still all through the night. Receiving a diagnosis was one of the best moments of my life. Some people might not understand why that is, but for me it was an answer to my problems, and in some ways, it was a solution as well.

Now that I have been diagnosed, I have been on a stimulant called Modafinil. Although it often takes away my appetite, for the most part, it does a decent job of keeping me awake. However, mornings are still the absolute worst. I love mornings, but I often miss them because I can’t will myself out of my bed. Because of this, I requested that my school let me sign up for classes early in order to ensure that I didn’t have any early morning classes. I don’t know if my school didn’t understand the depths of my disorder because they had never heard of it, but I was not welcomed with understanding. In fact, I was told that there was only so much that could be done for me without risking me jeopardizing the system. Well, if you have ever been in college, I’m sure you know that the system is already pretty messed up, but this was just another situation where I felt misunderstood and hopeless.

Sleepy is not a synonym for lazy. I often imagine my life without idiopathic hypersomnia. I think of all the things that I could accomplish, all the challenges that I wouldn’t have to face, and all the mornings that I would be awake for. After I am done feeling sorry for myself, I move on to think about all the things I have accomplished, all the lessons I have learned, and all the relationships I have built not only despite of IH, but also because of IH. All I ask for is understanding. I’m not making excuses, and I’m not being lazy, but I am still trying to just figure this all out. It might take a few (or a lot) of naps along the way, but someday, I hope to get my mornings back.

Source

Absolute Best Ever Lasagna

  • Ingredients

  • 12lbs lean ground beef
  • 12lb Italian sausage or 12 lb ground veal
  • 1large onion, chopped
  • 2 -3garlic cloves, minced
  • 1teaspoon salt
  • 1teaspoon fresh coarse ground black pepper
  • 1tablespoon dried parsley flakes
  • 1tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1tablespoon dried basil
  • 2(14 1/2 ounce) cans whole tomatoes, undrained and chopped (or canned chopped tomatoes)
  • 24ounces ricotta cheese
  • 2eggs, beaten
  • 12teaspoon pepper
  • 2tablespoons parsley
  • 12cup grated parmesan cheese
  • 1lb mozzarella cheese, divided
  • 12 -15lasagna noodles

Directions

  1. Brown ground meat, onion and garlic.
  2. Add salt, pepper, parsley, oregano, basil, chopped tomatoes with juice; stirring until well mixed.
  3. Cover and simmer 1 hour (or longer,but watch for getting too dry).
  4. Cook lasagna noodles according to package directions; drain and set aside.
  5. Spray a 13 x 9″ baking pan with cooking spray.
  6. Combine riccota cheese, eggs, pepper, 2 tablespoons parsley, Parmesan cheese and 1/2 1lb of mozzarella cheese; In a lasagna pan, layer noodles, meat sauce, and cheese mixture; repeat.
  7. Top off with layer of noodles; sprinkle evenly with remaining mozzarella cheese; make sure to cover noodles completely.
  8. Bake at 375F for 40-60 minutes, or until cheese mixture is thoroughly melted. (I cover w/ foil for about 40 minutes, then uncover for 15-20 minutes.
  9. Let sit for 15-20 minutes before cutting and serving.

Europe’s most dangerous pathogens: Climate change increasing risks

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Europe’s most dangerous pathogens: Climate change increasing risks

Date:
August 2, 2017
Source:
University of Liverpool
Summary:
The impact of climate change on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases could be greater than previously thought, according to new research.

The impact of climate change on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases could be greater than previously thought, according to new research by the University of Liverpool.

The study, published in Scientific Reports, is the first large-scale assessment of how climate affects bacterium, viruses or other microorganisms and parasites (pathogens) that can cause disease in humans or animals in Europe.

The results will help policy makers prioritise the surveillance for pathogens that may respond to climate change and, in turn, contribute to strengthening climate change resilience for infectious diseases.

Epidemics

There is growing evidence that climate change is altering the distribution of some diseases, in some cases causing epidemics or making diseases spread within their natural range, for example, Zika virus in South America, or bluetongue and Schmallenberg disease in livestock in Europe.

Dr Marie McIntyre, who led the project at the University’s Institute of Infection and Global Health, explained: “Although there is a well-established link between climate change and infectious disease, we did not previously understand how big the effects will be and which diseases will be most affected.

“Climate sensitivity of pathogens is a key indicator that diseases might respond to climate change, so assessing which pathogens are most climate-sensitive, and their characteristics, is vital information if we are to prepare for the future.”

Largest effects

The researchers carried out a systematic review of published literature on one hundred human and one hundred domestic animal pathogens present in Europe that have the largest impact on health.

Nearly two-thirds of the pathogens examined were found to be sensitive to climate; and two-thirds of these have more than one climate driver, meaning that the impact of climate change upon them will likely be multifaceted and complex.

Diseases spread by insects and ticks (vector-borne diseases) were found to be the most climate sensitive, followed by those transmitted in soil, water and food. The diseases with the largest number of different climate drivers were Vibrio cholerae (cause of cholera), Fasciola hepatica (cause of liver fluke), Bacillus anthracis (cause of anthrax) and Borrelia burgdorferi (cause of tickborne Lyme disease).

Future effects

Dr Marie McIntyre, commented: “Currently, most models examining climate effects only consider a single or at most two climate drivers, so our results suggest that this should change if we really want to understand future impacts of climate change on health.”

Zoonotic pathogens — those that spread from animals to humans — were also found to be more climate sensitive than those that affect only humans or only animals. As 75% of emerging diseases are zoonotic, emerging diseases may be particularly likely to be impacted by climate change.

However, the researchers stress that their response to climate change will also be dependent on the impacts of other drivers, such as changes to travel and trade, land-use, deforestation, new control measures and the development of antimicrobial resistance.

Big Data

The top 100 human and animals list was compiled using the Enhanced Infectious Disease Database (EID2), — a comprehensive and open-access ‘Big Data’ record of over 60 million scientific papers, electronic sources and textbooks associated with infectious diseases that was developed in Liverpool.


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Materials provided by University of LiverpoolNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

New light shed on Lyme disease-causing bacteria

Image result for lyme disease infections 2017Prompt removal of ticks can help prevent transmission of Borrelia mayonii

Date:
august 13, 2017
Source:
Entomological Society of America
Summary:
A new species of bacteria that causes Lyme disease needs the same amount of time for transmission after a tick bite compared to previously implicated bacteria, according to new research. Existing guidelines for frequent tick checks and prompt removal of attached ticks remain the same.

A new species of bacteria that causes Lyme disease needs the same amount of time for transmission after a tick bite compared to previously implicated bacteria, according to new research by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Existing guidelines for frequent tick checks and prompt removal of attached ticks remain the same.

The duration of attachment of a single nymphal blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) needed for the tick to be likely to transmit the bacterial species Borrelia mayonii, identified in 2016, is 48 hours or more, according to the study. By 72 hours, however, likelihood of transmission has risen significantly. This timeframe aligns with existing research on Borrelia burgdorferi, previously the sole bacteria species known to cause Lyme disease in the United States. The research is published in the Entomological Society of America’s Journal of Medical Entomology.

“Our findings show that recommendations for regular tick checks and prompt tick removal as a way to prevent transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes to humans via the bites of infected ticks applies to the newly recognized B. mayonii as well as B. burgdorferi, for which these recommendations originally were developed,” says Lars Eisen, Ph.D., CDC research entomologist and senior author of the study.

The study authors tested transmission rates of B. mayonii from ticks to mice at four time intervals: 24, 48, and 72 hours after attachment and after the tick’s full feed. Their experiment focused on nymphal-stage ticks (the more common source of pathogen transmission, compared to larval or adult ticks) and exposed the mice to a single infected tick each. They found no evidence of transmission by single nymphs infected with B. mayonii in the first 24 or 48 hours, but 31 percent of mice examined after 72 hours were found to be infected. In mice examined after a tick’s complete feed (4-5 days), the infection rate was 57 percent.

“Our findings underscore the importance of finding and removing ticks as soon as possible after they bite,” says Eisen.

Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States, with around 300,000 people estimated to be diagnosed each year, mostly in the Northeast and upper Midwest regions. The blacklegged tick is the primary vector of Lyme disease as well as at least a dozen other illnesses.

To reduce the risk of tick bites and tickborne diseases, CDC recommendations include:

  • Avoid wooded and brushy areas with high grass and leaf litter.
  • Use insect repellent when outdoors.
  • Use products that contain permethrin on clothing.
  • Bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors to wash off and more easily find ticks.
  • Conduct a full-body tick check after spending time outdoors.
  • Examine gear and pets, as ticks can come into the home on these and later attach to people.

The bacterial species B. mayonii was discovered when six patients exhibiting symptoms of Lyme disease at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in 2013 showed unusual blood-test results. The discovery of the new species was confirmed in 2016.

“There is much still to discover about B. mayonii, including to clarify the geographic range of this emerging human pathogen in the U.S., to determine how commonly different life stages of the blacklegged tick are infected with B. mayonii, and to find out whether the same vertebrate animals that serve as natural reservoirs for B. burgdorferi play the same role also for B. mayonii,” says Eisen.


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Materials provided by Entomological Society of AmericaNote: Content may be edited for style and length.